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The Lone Coastguard!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 28-01-2014 08:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's the time of year when the RNLI tallies up its activities for the previous year. Look on your local websites (eg BBC, local press) for what happened in your area. This one is just a sample:

RNLI in action around the Isle of Wight
By a County Press reporter
Tuesday, January 28, 2014

LIFEBOAT crews on the Isle of Wight were kept busy in 2013, according to figures released by the RNLI.

Collectively, crews from the RNLI stations at Bembridge, Cowes and Yarmouth launched on 112 rescue missions last year, to incidents including commercial vessels in trouble, distressed fishermen, swimmers and leisure marine users.

The busiest of the three was Cowes with 43 launches. In a year of extreme weather, crews from these stations rescued a total of 139 people.

The figures, however, were down significantly on 2012, when crews launched 147 times and rescued 241 people.

Among the notable rescues in 2013 were:

•Bembridge lifeboat crew rescued a man who had suffered a stroke and was stranded on an old military fort in the Solent. The coxswain had to be creative and used a rather unorthodox method of using ropes, a hook and a plastic stretcher.

•Two men whose fishing vessel capsized and sank in the Solent in a matter of seconds were rescued by Yarmouth RNLI. One was still in his sleeping bag when the disaster happened — both were found in a liferaft some hours later.

•Volunteers at Cowes were involved in a search for an inebriated man who had plunged into the River Medina in the middle of the night. He attempted to swim the river having missed the last chain ferry for the night.

The Isle of Wight is also served by independent lifeboats at Sandown and Shanklin, Ryde and Freshwater.

http://www.iwcp.co.uk/news/news/rnli-in-action-around-the-isle-of-wight-52557.aspx

There's also a panel on the page summarising activity around the country.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 28-01-2014 09:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a dramatic bit of video!

Brutal way to scrap a ship as team beaches 26,000 ton Pride of Calais on purpose
6:00pm Monday 27th January 2014

Falmouth has seen plenty of ships arrive for repair over the years, but thankfully none have arrived the way this former channel ferry did at a Turkish scrap yard

For more than 20 years, the MS Pride of Calais plied her way across the English channel disgorging thousands of motorists and holidaymakers in France.

These days things aren't looking quite so rosy.
Forlorn and unwanted, the 26,000 tonne ship lies beached in a Turkish breakers yard awaiting her destruction.

The Pride of Calais served on the cross-Channel route from 1987 to 2012. Last year she sailed between Ramsgate and Ostend before being send to the scrap yard in October.

Dismantling such a large ship is a specialist job that takes hundreds of men several months, and the specialists at the breakers yard in Aliaga, Turkey, have a spectacularly brutal method.

http://www.falmouthpacket.co.uk/news/10966399.VIDEO__Brutal_way_to_scrap_a_ship_as_team_beaches_26_000_ton_Pride_of_Calais_on_purpose/?ref=mr

Watch video full screen for best 'impact'!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYltdonj2iE
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 28-01-2014 14:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Victress is under way at 7.6 knots, destination Port Ellen.

Another tanker, Kithnos, is arriving in the bay. And tanker Philine Schulte seems to be heading for the harbour entrance.

The 3 cargo ships that were anchored south of Helford have all sailed. Locally the wind is NW, 24 knots.

Fast Jef is SW of Lands End, heading for Newport, and Bothniadiep has just passed the Lizard, destination Garston. Mykola Slavov is south of the Lizard, heading SW, bound for Bari, Italy.

S and W of the Lizard the wind is NW 29 knots.
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PostPosted: 28-01-2014 14:37    Post subject: Reply with quote

1433: Philine Schulte entered the harbour, with a PV leading, but on the next AIS refresh she's heading ENE towards St Mawes Castle! Not sure what's happening there... Question

1439: Now she's stopped, and the PV is back with her. It's an unusual place to anchor, right in the middle of the deep water entrance channel, but maybe there's a reason for it...

The PV heads N towards the Jack-up Barge in Carrick Roads...

1448: There was activity around the barge and her tugs this morning, and I wondered then if they were preparing to sail. It's now just about HW.

1453: That was a quick visit - the PV is heading back to base!
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 28-01-2014 15:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

1508: PV Arrow is back with the barge. If JB 115 is leaving, I'll miss another chance to get some photos because of the bus situation. But there are heavy showers around, so conditions may not be ideal anyway.
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PostPosted: 29-01-2014 07:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wednesday Shipping forecast:

The general synopsis at midnight
Low western France 985 expected Wight 997 by midnight tonight. Low Wales 983 losing its identity

Issued 29 January 04:05 UTC

A change from all the westerly storms - cold winds from the east for much of Britain! Rolling Eyes In the Channel, SE winds in the east, Northerly winds in the west as they circle the new Low.

Still several gale warnings in force, but Force 9 is the maximum mentioned: details
http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast_and_sea/shipping_forecast
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PostPosted: 29-01-2014 07:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

New maximum individual wave height recorded off Ireland from a weather buoy last Sunday
Posted: 28 Jan 2014 05:54 AM PST

The M4 weather buoy, located off the Northwest coast, recorded a new maximum individual wave height of 23.4 metres at 15.00 on Sunday 26thJanuary 2014 during the weekend storm. This figure easily surpasses the previous record of 20.4 metres at the same location in December 2011.

The M4 buoy is one of a new generation of weather buoys with the ability to measure maximum wave height as well as the more usual Significant Wave Height.

The Significant Wave Height is defined as the average height of the highest one-third of the waves and that is what our forecasts of wave height refer to. In general, the highest wave of all will be about twice the Significant Wave Height.

etc...

http://www.met.ie/news/display.asp?ID=237

The big waves have not only done damage to the coasts, but have effects way below the surface - ground seas have been ripping up tons of seaweed, and their brown rubbery stems are reported piling up on the tide line around Mounts Bay, for example.
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PostPosted: 29-01-2014 10:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

I post this not only for the reading list, but for the photo of a racing yacht,
beating to windward in a Force 10 storm in Biscay!!!
Shocked

Why reading about the sea is almost as good as sailing on it
Horatio Clare recommends a few of his favourite maritime novels
By Horatio Clare
7:00AM GMT 29 Jan 2014

The second-best thing about writing a book about travels at sea, after circling the globe on giant container ships, is the research. One inspiration was Alistair MacLean’s HMS Ulysses (1955). MacLean survived two Arctic convoys. The product is a gripping, shivering story of endurance in hell.

The Cruel Sea (1951) by Nicholas Monsarrat will bewitch any reader discovering it for the first time. The heroes are the men, the heroines are ships and the only villain is the cruel sea itself.

The sea’s power to reveal and test character is its real attraction for the writer. Joseph Conrad’s least read book, perhaps because of its unfortunate title, is The Nigger of the Narcissus (1897). But it is a plain masterpiece, containing some of the most transcendent writing Conrad ever achieved.

Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851) is wonderfully strange, rich and transporting, and both a comfort and a warning to all who write for a living. On publication the reviewers said it was so bad Melville should have been ashamed of the waste of paper.

There are many supreme sea stories, from Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea to Joshua Slocum’s Sailing Alone Around the World and Erskine Childers’ The Riddle of the Sands, which led the British government to establish a string of naval bases. But my final favourite is A Twist of Sand (1959) by Geoffrey Jenkins, which takes you to Namibia’s Skeleton Coast, perhaps the wildest littoral in all the world, and there binds you in an engrossing mystery.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/authorinterviews/10596185/Why-reading-about-the-sea-is-almost-as-good-as-sailing-on-it.html
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PostPosted: 29-01-2014 10:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

Philine Schulte, which was anchored in the entrance to Falmouth Harbour, is now 8.6 NM SE of Zone Pont, heading for Portsmouth. She sailed at 0950. It's not clear why she anchored there - the shelter in the bay was just as good, if not better.

There are now just 3 tankers in the bay.
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PostPosted: 29-01-2014 14:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

Action in the Carrick Roads. JB 115 and the tug Bugsier 21 are still there, but now a fairly large tanker, FSL Hamburg, is arriving, attended by 3 tugs and the Harbour Master's launch, Killigrew. HW is at 1557.

1422: FSL Hamburg has gone past JB 115. JB 115's other tug, Vortex, has reappeared from somewhere.

1427: FSL Hamburg is off St Just Creek. If she doesn't anchor there, she might be going up the Fal to be laid up.

1432: The flotilla continues up the main channel of the Carrick Roads. (Killigrew has turned back to Falmouth, because this part of the harbour, and the river Fal, comes under the control of Truro HM.) The PV Arrow is ahead of the convoy.

1442: They continue round the westward curve of the channel. The tugs with the tanker are Percuil, Ankorva, and St Piran.

1447: The convoy rounds the bend and starts to head NE for the start of the Fal River.

1452: The tugs reposition themselves, one ahead, and two close to the bows of the tanker.

The Carrick Roads narrow down now. On a previous occassion, the AIS signal started to get lost in the river. I'll start a new post on the next refresh, and see how we get on.
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PostPosted: 29-01-2014 14:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

1457: Now the tugs are one ahead, two astern - a couple of bends coming up, around Turnaware Bar, and into the Fal...

1502: The convoy passes Turnaware, and enters the river. Arrow is just a short way ahead.

1507: All 3 tugs ahead again, but the ship looks too close to the NW shore... (that could be the start of an AIS hiccup).

1512: Arrow is Stopped: the tugs are playing musical chairs again... FSL Hamburg may not be going much further up.

1517: All the vessels are still showing on AIS. Convoy now close to the eastern side of the river. This part of the River is King Harry's Reach - not far ahead is the chain ferry that links the Roseland to the western part of Cornwall.

1522: Still they continue northwards - will they go beyond the ferry?

1527: The PV has dropped back alongside the leading tug, Percuil. They must be preparing to berth the ship. (There are big mooring buoys laid there.)

1532: All vessels close up, and continue north. Looks like they are going beyond the ferry. HW at Truro is 1608, which means they still have the last of the flood under them.

1537: The tanker passes the ferry, the tugs follow astern. Arrow is heading east round the next bend in the River, where there are more moorings. The Tanker can't go much further...

1542: No, all change! FSL Hamburg has now turned to head south, into the last of the tide. Arrow returns from her little excursion upriver...

1547: The tanker and one of the tugs have stopped. This is obviously where she's mooring, north of the ferry. They'll be getting ropes and chains onto the mooring buoys fore and aft. (There's no swinging room for conventional anchoring up here.)

1552: All vessels have stopped now, apart from Ankorva, which is still below the ferry.
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PostPosted: 29-01-2014 16:02    Post subject: Reply with quote

1557: No movement from anything at the last refresh! Have we fallen into the AIS black hole at last?

But the operation seems to be all done and dusted now. An efficient job of work. When the tanker is fully secured, the tugs and PV will return to Falmouth.

A caretaker crew will remain on the ship for security when everyone else has left. When night falls, and the ferry stops running, they'll find themselves in deepest, darkest Cornwall, with barely a light to be seen...

1608: Percuil is heading for home already. Arrow stays near the tanker for now.

1612: St Piran also makes her way south...

King Harry Ferry's website gives an idea of the locality:
http://www.falriver.co.uk/getting-about/ferries/king-harry-ferry
Scroll down for a pic of FSL Hamburg passing by, with a tug astern! Cool

I'll check MarineTraffic for pics later -I'm pretty sure some of the local photographers work afloat...

1623: Arrow still with the ship. Ankorva seems to be frozen in a time warp. Still, I saw more than I expected to see from up there. I did have plans to go to town this afternoon, but this was more fun! Very Happy

But now I must go to the local shop, and then prepare supper.
I'll be back dreckly!
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 07:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is no weather today - well, not as much as we've had recently! Very Happy

The general synopsis at midnight
Lows Plymouth 997 and Portland 997 both losing their identities by midnight tonight

Issued 30 January 04:05 UTC

A mere 15 Gale warnings - only those for the west coast of Ireland and the Hebrides mention the chance of Force 9.

Details: http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast_and_sea/shipping_forecast
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 07:59    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fairly quiet in the Falmouth area. Two tankers in the bay,one of which is alongside a cargo ship. Winds light northerly.

A coaster, Jan V, is anchored off Porthoustock, waiting for the tide: HW 1653. She'll probably start moving in alongside about 1400 to 1500. Jan V came up from Brest, unusually.

FSL Hamburg, the ship that laid up in the Fal yesterday, is still showing on AIS.
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 08:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

A minor mystery on the north Cornish coast. A coaster called River Pride is anchored off the rocky coast midway between Godrevy LH and Portreath. She has come from somewhere just as anonymous off the south Pembroke coast, north of Stackpole Head. Her destination is given as SZCZECIN, in Poland! (Sometimes Anglicized to Stettin.)

What was she doing in Pembrokeshire? Why is she stopped off Cornwall?

The makings of a mystery thriller here! Cool

EDIT: Especially when the two rocky coves just south of her are called Hell's Mouth and Deadman's Cove!
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