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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 08:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Padstow speedboat deaths: Fast turn led to tragedy, report says

A TV executive and his daughter died after he tried to execute a fast turn in their speedboat, investigators have said.
All six members of the Milligan family, from London, were thrown out of the boat in Cornwall last May.

Nick Milligan, 51, and his daughter Emily, eight, died as the boat circled out of control, the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) said.
The MAIB said an emergency "kill cord" to cut the engine had not been worn.

Mr Milligan's wife Victoria, 39, and son Kit, four, were severely injured in the accident.
The report said that Mrs Milligan had taken the helm of the speedboat Milly on the Camel Estuary near Padstow when BSkyB sales boss Mr Milligan said she should make a turn.
"Mrs Milligan was reluctant to do so as she did not consider there was sufficient space between the boat and the beach," said the report.
"However, due to encouragement from the children and Mr Milligan she began a slow wide turn.

"Mr Milligan then reached across, in front of his wife, took the helm in his right hand and the throttle in his left, and then increased the engine throttle setting to full as he turned the helm to starboard.
"The boat immediately accelerated and heeled into the turn and then suddenly, and violently, rolled back to port and ejected all its occupants out over the port side and into the water
.

"The boat then continued to circle under full power.
"The family were on the surface of the water, supported by their lifejackets and buoyancy aids, and the boat circled back towards them, striking several of them."

The report said Mr Milligan's actions appeared out of character, adding: "It cannot be established whether the wine he had consumed about one-and-a-half hours earlier adversely affected his judgment or fine motor skills when he reached across and took the controls, but his alcohol levels were well below the drink-drive limit for UK roads."

MAIB chief inspector Steve Clinch said a kill cord attached to the person at the wheel was an "essential item of safety equipment".
"I most strongly urge all powerboat drivers to ensure one is fitted and correctly worn at all times when under way, and to regularly check that it is functioning correctly," he said.

He called it a "tragic accident" and hoped lessons would be learned.
"Avoiding an accident by knowing your boat's and your own capabilities and limitations is essential, as is ensuring that all on board are safely and securely seated whenever manoeuvring or travelling at speed," he said.

Recommendations have been made to the Royal Yachting Association (RYA) to include advice on the potential hazards of high power operations in its tuition and for the boat's manufacturer, APV Marine Limited, to reduce the design's steep angle of heel in tight turns.

Richard Falk, the training manager of the RYA, said: "If one good thing can possibly come from this tragedy it's that this issue of kill cords has received a great deal of media scrutiny.
"We would like to hope that has made more people aware of the hazards of operating a more powerful craft without a kill cord attached."

The family said in a statement: "We are still coming to terms with this tragic accident which has left us without Nick, a loving husband, father, son and brother, and Emily, whose life was only just beginning.
"We sincerely hope that awareness of this accident will mean that another family does not have to go through anything similar."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-25948960
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 11:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

River Pride is finally off again, heading west to round Lands End before heading up Channel towards Poland.


In Mounts Bay, MTS Xplorer is working inshore off Loe Bar. As she's a small survey vessel, I'd guess they're checking how the sea-bed has altered in the recent storms. A good quiet day to do it.
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 17:19    Post subject: Reply with quote

1710: River Pride making slow progress - she's now between Wolf Rock and Lands End.

Jan V got into Porthoustock about 1400. Must be leaving soon, the PV is on its way.

1745: Jan V is away to the east at 10 knots, bound for... Shoreham!
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 18:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

1852: River Pride is now about 10 NM west of the Lizard, doing 7.1 knots.

2030: She passes south of the Lizard.
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 08:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

High tides prompt Aberystwyth university students move
[video]

Up to 600 students are being moved from their seafront rooms in Aberystwyth as high tides and wind are forecast.
After new year storms battered the town's promenade causing severe damage, the university has also cancelled lectures to ensure people are safe.

Students have to leave their properties by 16:00 GMT on Friday and are not expected to return until Monday.
"Our priority is the safety of our students and staff," said pro vice-chancellor Rebecca Davies.
"The forecasted high winds combined with the high tides are likely to make the seafront at Aberystwyth a very hazardous place this weekend and it is paramount for us that everyone living in residences on the seafront have alternative accommodation, and are out of harm's way," she said.

Of the 600 students on the seafront, about 450 live in university-owned accommodation.
They are being offered alternative accommodation and meals at the university's Penglais campus or help with travel arrangements if they want to go home or leave the area until conditions improve.
Lectures on Friday and Monday have also been cancelled.

A band of heavy rain is expected throughout Friday, prompting warnings of localised flooding across south Wales in paticular.
But from Friday night into Saturday high tides combined with very strong winds will create a high risk of coastal flooding, Natural Resources Wales (NRW) said.

Most of the Welsh coastline is likely to experience stormy conditions, but the worst affected areas are likely to be in south and west Wales where tidal surges and large waves could cause flooding and transport disruption.

Current forecasts show that the tides will peak on Saturday - in both the morning and in the evening.
High tides and strong winds will continue next week with Monday morning's high tide also likely to create a risk of coastal flooding.

"We are working closely with the Met Office to track the developing storm and its severity," said a NRW spokesperson.
"The coastal storm surge is not currently expected to be as severe as at the beginning of January. However, we are advising people to be precautionary and be prepared in case the situation deteriorates.
"We strongly advise people to stay clear of promenades and sea fronts as they could be swept away by large waves or hit by debris.
"Natural Resources Wales' staff will be checking our coastal and river defences are in good working order, clearing watercourses and working closely with local authorities to help ensure communities are prepared ahead of the weekend's weather."

Aberystwyth was one of the towns hardest hit by heavy rain, strong winds, high tides and a sea surge that hit between 3 and 6 January.
Hundreds of people including students had to leave their homes ahead of the high tide.

A Grade II-listed shelter partly fell into a hole after its foundations were washed away as massive waves pounded the promenade.
The 1920s' landmark was badly damaged and has been dismantled for repair.
Ceredigion council estimates the cost of repairing the promenade has topped £1.5m and fears the bill will increase if similar storms hit the town this weekend.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-mid-wales-25968198
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 09:04    Post subject: Reply with quote

A bit of a holiday from the weather yesterday, but today it's back - only Trafalgar doesn't have a gale warning.

The general synopsis at midnight
High western russia 1058 slow moving, declining 1051 by midnight tonight. Low mid Atlantic 955 expected just west of Rockall 942 by same time

Issued 31 January 04:05 UTC

details: http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast_and_sea/shipping_forecast
West coasts from Ireland to Faeroes might get up to Force 10.

High tide times vary around the coasts: check yours here:
http://easytide.ukho.gov.uk/EASYTIDE/EasyTide/SelectPort.aspx

But the Spring Tides will be high everywhere. In Falmouth, for example, HW is not predicted below 5.0m until Thursday.

The coasts will be dangerous. Only go wave-watching from high ground, and even there be alert for freak waves.
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 09:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

Storm: Waves and tides alert on Devon and Cornwall coast

'Storm chasers' are on alert for a combination of huge waves and spring tides heading towards the South West coast once again.
The Plymouth University experts will monitor the effect of the storm, dubbed Hercules Take Two, on tidal defences.

The Environment Agency has issued a number of flood warnings amid forecasts of heavy rain after [one of] the wettest Januaries on record.
It warned of "significant disruption" throughout the South West.

A team of storm-chasing marine scientists are planning to set up their monitoring equipment at Porthleven in Cornwall on Friday.
Waves of more than 5m (16ft) high were recorded there in November by the Rapid Coastal Response Unit in the past.
The unit measures the impact of the pounding surf on the gravel beach, a natural coastal defence.

Principal investigator Professor Gerd Masselink said: "There is currently limited scientific guidance available to provide beach managers with operational tools to predict the response of gravel beaches to extreme storms.
"To properly record storm response, conditions before, during and after the storm need to be recorded.
"This means we have to head out at very short notice and then stay on-site for as long as it takes."

Devon-based surf forecasters Magic Seaweed said the storm would not have the same intensity as the one dubbed Hercules which battered the coast over the new year.
Magic Seaweed's Ben Freeston said: "Hercules Take Two is a very different storm but the results - massive swell and gale force winds coupled with huge spring tides - make for a similarly apocalyptic vibe."

The Environment Agency warned areas at risk on Saturday and Sunday include coasts and tidal areas of Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Somerset, Bristol and South Gloucestershire.
Kate Marks, an Environment Agency flood risk manager, said: "A low pressure system combining with high tides brings a risk of coastal flooding to many parts of England.
"The risk is highest for south west England and the public should stay away from the coasts and tidal areas and not drive through flood water."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-25960465
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 15:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Southampton Western Docks receives new cranes

Cranes worth £26m are being rolled into place at a new Southampton quay wall.
The four 1,300-tonne, 126m (413ft) high gantry cranes were assembled at the container terminal and are being moved 150m (492ft) to the Western Docks on remote-controlled trailers.
Port Director Nick Ridehalgh said they would service the next generation of ultra-large container ships.
Each crane was shipped in several parts from Ireland and can reach across ships 24 containers wide.
A fifth is due to be relocated from an existing berth to complete the £150m expansion of the terminal.

Mr Ridehalgh said: "These impressive cranes are a demonstration of our confidence in the future of the port of Southampton and its container operation.
"They will allow us to continue to handle the biggest ships afloat, both now and long into the future, and will keep the container port, which is already the most efficient in Europe, at the forefront of the industry."

In December the Marco Polo, the world's largest container ship, measuring 54m (177ft) wide and 396m (1,299ft) long, visited the docks.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-25967377
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 15:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also in Southampton:

Matchstick modeller creates flotilla of miniature ships

David Reynolds knows a thing or two about making matchstick models.
The retired oil rig worker, from Swaythling in Southampton, has got through about six million matchsticks after taking up the hobby between shifts while working at sea.
Twenty-five years on and almost 30 matchstick ships later, a collection of his work has gone on display in a Southampton museum.

He said he took up the hobby after first trying embroidery to pass time on the rig.
"One Christmas, my son bought me a matchstick kit of a train, then I built an oil rig and it got a bit out of hand."
The replica of the Brent Bravo rig, which he completed in July 2009, broke the Guinness World Records record for the largest matchstick model and used over four million sticks.

After that, he decided to concentrate on ships.
He has completed models of a number of famous vessels, including the ill-fated liner Titanic, Nelson's flagship HMS Victory, salvaged Tudor warship the Mary Rose, and the ocean liners Queen Mary and QE2.

Mr Reynolds uses 20kg (44 lbs) boxes of matchsticks, nail clippers, tweezers and glue to create the models, the design of which comes from photographs or, in the case of the Mary Rose, an oil painting.

Each vessel is made up of an average of 40,000 matchsticks and takes around nine months to build, with the biggest ship in his collection, the Titanic, measuring just under 5ft (1.5m) in length.

He said modelling was "just a little hobby".
"I don't think much of it, but our spare room is chock-a-block with them.
"All I ever do is a couple of hours in the evening, I don't do it religiously.
"People watch TV for six or seven hours a night and they've not achieved anything - at least by the end of the week I've got something." Cool

His favourite vessels to build are the classic sail ships, where he uses waxed crochet cotton for the rigging, which is painstakingly pegged to get the tension.
"The most fragile part to make is the anchor," he said
"I bend the matches slowly with a fingernail to make them."

Mr Reynolds, who has also created a replica of the museum housing his collection, added that he was "slowing down a bit now", but had no intention to stop.
"I'm just glad people enjoy them," he said.

The replica fleet of ships will be on show at the Tudor House Museum in Southampton until 7 September.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-25957733
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 16:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

...and nowhere near Southampton:

Cast away: Shipwrecked man makes land 'after 16 months adrift'
Shipwrecked man washes up on Pacific atoll 'after spending 16 months adrift, floating up to 8,000 miles from Mexico'
By Barney Henderson, and AFP
3:48PM GMT 31 Jan 2014

An emaciated man survived 16 months adrift at sea, eating turtles, birds and fish and drinking turtle blood, having floated up to 8,000 miles from Mexico to a remote Pacific atoll, it was claimed on Friday.

A Norwegian researcher said that the man – who only speaks Spanish and has a long beard – was not in a good condition after his 24-foot fibreglass boat washed up on the reef at Ebon Atoll.

In a story reminiscent of the Tom Hanks film Cast Away - or perhaps Ang Lee's Life of Pi - the man, dressed only in ragged underpants, apparently set off from Mexico heading for El Salvador in September 2012. He was travelling with a companion, who apparently died at sea several months ago.

"His condition isn't good, but he's getting better," Ola Fjeldstad, a Norwegian anthropology student doing research on Ebon, told AFP by telephone. The man had low blood pressure and was incredibly thin, but was able to walk and had no life-treatening condition.

Details of his survival are not clear, Mr Fjeldstad added, but he said his name was Jose Ivan.
"The boat is really scratched up and looks like it has been in the water for a long time," said the researcher. "He has a long beard and hair."
Mr Ivan indicated to Mr Fjeldstad that he survived by eating turtles, birds and fish and drinking turtle blood when there was no rain.

No fishing equipment was on the boat and Mr Ivan suggested he somehow caught turtles and birds with his bare hands. There was a turtle on the boat when it landed at Ebon.

Stories of survival in the vast Pacific are not uncommon.
In 2006, three Mexicans made international headlines when they were discovered drifting in the middle of the ocean in their stricken boat, nine months after setting out on a shark-fishing expedition.
And in 1992, two fishermen from Kiribati were at sea for 177 days before coming ashore in Samoa.

According to Ms Fjeldstad, the Marshall Islanders who found Ivan took him to the main island on the atoll to meet Mayor Ione de Brum, who put in a call to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Majuro.
Officials at the Foreign Ministry said on Friday they were waiting to get more details and for the man to be brought to Majuro.

The government airline's only plane that can land at Ebon is currently down for maintenance and is not expected to return to service until Tuesday at the earliest, with officials considering sending a boat to pick up the castaway.
"He's staying at the local council house and a family is feeding him," said Mr Fjeldstad.
"We've been giving him a lot of water, and he's gaining strength," said the Norwegian.

The Marshall Islands, in the northern Pacific, are home to barely 60,000 people spread over 24 atolls, with most of them standing at an average of just two metres above sea level.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/marshallislands/10609011/Cast-away-Shipwrecked-man-makes-land-after-16-months-adrift.html
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 16:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner2 wrote:
Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851) is wonderfully strange, rich and transporting, and both a comfort and a warning to all who write for a living. On publication the reviewers said it was so bad Melville should have been ashamed of the waste of paper.

I've nearly finished reading that myself and I'm hugely impressed with it. It's beautiful, strange, amusing, sad, filled with references that could keep you going forever and just so wonderfully written. It's by far one of the best novels I've ever read, and seems far more modern than it's date would suggest.

As to the weather on my particular patch of coat - well the wind's picking up steadily, and it's lashing with rain. We're in for a rough night I think Confused
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 23:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

FSL Hamburg being escorted up the Carrick Roads yesterday by three tugs:

http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/photos/picture/ships/1527925/9311713

(View from Loe Beach.)

More Hamburg pics nearby...
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PostPosted: 01-02-2014 08:39    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saturday Shipping Fx

The general synopsis at midnight
Low northern Ireland 970 expected Bailey 961 by midnight tonight. Low just west of Rockall 941 moving eastwards and losing its identity

Issued 1 February 04:05 UTC

And a full house of Gale Warnings! (Several 9s and 10s, 11 in Shannon...)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast_and_sea/shipping_forecast
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PostPosted: 01-02-2014 20:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

The SAR helicopter, which now seems to be based at Lee-on-Solent again, has had a busy day. She's been as far west as Bournemouth Airport and its environs, out to sea south of Christchurch, covered most of the Solent, the centre of the IoW, and as far east as Beachy Head, and a visit to Shoreham (Brighton City) Airport, not to mention other places.

She's been active since about midday till 1930. Some of that may have been SAR related, since she may have visited the hospital at Southampton too, but I didn't follow this live and her track would take too long now to unravel.

If she wasn't involved in SAR, maybe she was acting as a CG eye-in-the-sky while we have this extreme weather and tides.
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PostPosted: 02-02-2014 06:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

SUNDAY Shipping Fx

The general synopsis at midnight
Low Bailey 961 expected 250 miles east of Iceland 974 by midnight tonight. New low expected Shannon 971 by same time. Low southeast Fair Isle 969 losing its identity

Issued 2 February 04:05 UTC

Gale warnings all areas except Tyne, but it's not quite as bad as it sounds - many of the gales in the east and south are decreasing. But the west and north still gets a heavy hit - up to storm force 10 in some areas.

Details: http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/coast_and_sea/shipping_forecast
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