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Cooking With Recipes
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escargot1Offline
Joined: 24 Aug 2001
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PostPosted: 22-12-2013 17:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

At least Mr Karswell wiped his arse well.
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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Joined: 02 Aug 2001
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Location: Manchester, UK
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PostPosted: 22-12-2013 20:37    Post subject: Reply with quote

They suffer from their reputation as "black-coated workers." This nickname was one I learned early from my grandmother, who served them at breakfast.

Serving them with custard was another old Brit. meal inspiration which has become symbolically horrible, even if the reality was probably quite pleasant.

My own generation rediscovered them as a rich enhancer of pork and other savouries, good in stuffings or wrapped in bacon.

Soft-dried prunes are a tasty snack and very quick to arrange as you dash to work. I have yet to suffer any other dashing which can be ascribed to them. Smile
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MythopoeikaOnline
Joined: 18 Sep 2001
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PostPosted: 22-12-2013 21:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

JamesWhitehead wrote:
Soft-dried prunes are a tasty snack and very quick to arrange as you dash to work. I have yet to suffer any other dashing which can be ascribed to them. Smile


My Mum eats a lot of these and has to dash off to the loo frequently.
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GinandoOffline
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PostPosted: 06-01-2014 08:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

HOT DOG SCRAMBLE.
Very tasty and cheap if on a budget.

2 eggs per person (whisked)
Onion
2 hot dogs per person
knob of butter
salt and pepper

Fry sliced onion in butter till soft and golden
add chopped hot dogs
add whisked egg and seasoning to taste

Keep stirring the mixture till the eggs are lightly scrambled, and still moist.
Serve immediately.

Enhanced Cuppa soup

Cuppa Soup
Oatcakes

This is only possible if you have access to Oatcakes which of course are a delicacy here in Scotland.

Take two sachets of otherwise dull cuppa soup or whatever proprietary dehydrated soups you have and make up as normal with boiling water.

I find this best with the likes of Chicken and leek soup, but feel free to experiment. Never ever try with tomato!

Crush an oatcake into crumbs and add to cuppa soup and stir in. Add two for a really thick soup.

Your watery soup will now be full bodied, thick and taste far superior (no pun intended) and filling.

CHEESE BEANO OR LUXURY CHEESE BEANO


Can of baked beans
Bread
Cheese Slices or grated cheese

Open can of beans and heat as normal
Make toast as normal and butter as desired
Pour hot beans over toast
place cheese slices/grated cheese over beans and grill till bubbling and golden
For luxury version, place ham slices on toast before covering with beans.

Somerset Toast

Grated cheese
grated peeled apple
Worcester sauce
bread

Mix grated cheese with grated apple and worcester sauce to taste.
Toast bread and apply butter if desired.
Cover bread with your cheesy apple spread and place under a hot grill until the cheese is melting.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 06-01-2014 09:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ginando wrote:
Enhanced Cuppa soup

Cuppa Soup
Oatcakes

This is only possible if you have access to Oatcakes which of course are a delicacy here in Scotland.

Rynner says: Oatcakes are easily available here, about as far as you can get from Scotland in UK! I often have them for supper with a slice of cheese.

I like the soup thickening idea, though I rarely use Cuppa soup. I'll try it in some of my more experimental soups!


CHEESE BEANO OR LUXURY CHEESE BEANO

Can of baked beans
Bread
Cheese Slices or grated cheese

Open can of beans and heat as normal
Make toast as normal and butter as desired
Pour hot beans over toast
place cheese slices/grated cheese over beans and grill till bubbling and golden
For luxury version, place ham slices on toast before covering with beans.

Rynner suggests: Make toast as normal, spread with butter and marmite for that extra 'bite'!
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escargot1Offline
Joined: 24 Aug 2001
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Age: 5
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PostPosted: 06-01-2014 10:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a frugal health-conscious vegetarian so soups are my favourite winter dish.
They turn out cheap and thick but healthy. A bit like me. Wink

You can make soup from nearly anything. If you make it too thin, add another chopped vegetable or a handful of pasta. Those tiny pasta tubes are best for this.

I never fry anything first as there's no need with just vegetables, unless I cook them in my Actifry first to make a posh Roast Vegetable Soup.
This usually happens when I buy a cheap job-lot of sweet peppers. Wink

Spicy Vegetable Soup

Peel/chop a load of your favourite root vegetables and simmer them in a big pan with water, vegetable stock and some dried chili flakes.
When the chunks are soft smooth them out with a liquidiser or hand blender.

Every time you make soup, include the dried chili flakes. No matter how dull the soup, it will then taste interesting.

You can also make gourmet Spiced Parsnip Soup, where you use parsnips and an onion simmered with some curry powder. Quite astonishingly tasty! I was recently served some with half a baked potato sunk into it in a posh Italian restaurant and will be trying that idea at home.

Also, Chili Minestrone Soup is nice, especially served with cheese on toast.
You can buy packets of minestrone ingredients at the supermarket. They are usually with the lentils and dried beans and are sometimes called Italian soup mix.

If you make one up with less water and a can of chopped tomatoes and some dried chili flakes it'll taste superb and cost hardly anything.

I buy a huge bag of dried chili flakes for about £2 from the supermarket. You only need a teaspoon to zing up a big pan of soup so it's a real economy.

Vegetable stock is available in a wide variety of forms - cubes, gels, liquids, what have you - so you can keep them in too.
Don't buy the cheapest Tesco ones as they are full of oil and leave a nasty film on top of your soup. Evil or Very Mad

Another good use for cheap root veg is Root Veg Mash, where you boil them all up together and drain and mash them with butter or margarine if you like. Much nicer and also healthier than potato mash and no more trouble to make.
You can drink the tasty veg water afterwards or use it in your next soup. Very Happy
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MercuryCrestOnline
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Joined: 24 Mar 2003
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PostPosted: 06-01-2014 18:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:

I never fry anything first as there's no need with just vegetables,


Oh, but if you sweat your veggies first, the flavor really develops. I always make a mire-poix in the pot I'm cooking soup in first, then add the stock to that. The flavor just infuses the stock.
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MythopoeikaOnline
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PostPosted: 06-01-2014 20:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Caramelising the veg a little bit is good for adding/concentrating the flavour.
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MercuryCrestOnline
The Severed Head Of A
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PostPosted: 06-01-2014 21:32    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pro-Tip:

If you're looking to caramelize, don't add salt. If you're looking to sweat, add a couple of pinches.
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escargot1Offline
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PostPosted: 06-01-2014 23:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aaaahh there y'see, fat and salt, my two worst fears. Laughing
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Naughty_FelidOffline
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PostPosted: 08-01-2014 21:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

Home made bread. I make this twice a week and use half at a time and store the rest in the fridge - the dough can be used for pizza bases and all sorts of stuff.

Bread makers meh - a tool of the devil! Twisted Evil

500g sifted flour
325 mls warm water. (have a bit more just to be on the safe side)
15g fresh yeast. 7g dried.
2 teaspoons of salt.

Sift flour and add salt.
I put the yeast in some of the warm water and add a little sugar and leave it until it's starts bubbling.

Pour in yeast and the rest of the water into the flour stir in with a fork.

Then turn out dough onto a floured board - dough should be sticky.

Knead for 10 mins then leave in a lightly oiled bowl, dusted with a little flour, covered somewhere warm for a couple of hours. It should double in size.

preheat an oven to gasmark 7 or around 220c (you may wanna play with this a bit depending on your oven).

Make the dough into the shape you want - cut a cross into the dough and cook for 20 -30 mins depending on how much you are using, on an oiled baking tray.

I tend to then leave for 10 mins on a grill covered by a tea towel.

There you go.


Passata - A good tomato stock that can be used to boost pasta dishes. I've not used a store bought sauce, Delmeo, etc for a couple of years now.

Passata:

2 tablespoons of good extra virgin Olive Oil, (don't use anything else as, such as light or pure as it's been chemically processed)

x2 celery sticks. broken up
1 carrot cut in half lengthways
1 red onion roughly chopped up
handful or fresh basil, if you don't have use oregano
tin of no salt plum tomatoes.
a little sugar
salt and pepper

Heat a large sauce pan with the oil. Fry veg and basil in a reasonably hot oil - not smoking. (Olive Oil doesn't do very hot and burns).

add salt and sugar, pepper with the tinned tomatoes. reduce heat and simmer for an hour. The longer you can simmer the richer it tastes.

If you have bung in a food processor to blitz. If not no worries.

I then let in cool and put it in a jar and store for a week in the fridge. The I add a tablespoon or 2 to tomato/pasta sauces. curries, pizza base sauces, chillis, etc to add richness.
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escargot1Offline
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Age: 5
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PostPosted: 08-01-2014 22:06    Post subject: Reply with quote

Used to make my own bread every day in my gas oven, until I moved to a house with only electricity and it just wouldn't rise any more!

It is so easy to make that I came to feel that bread wants to be made. Cool
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MythopoeikaOnline
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PostPosted: 08-01-2014 22:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
Aaaahh there y'see, fat and salt, my two worst fears. Laughing


So...you don't like that ol' taste thing?
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escargot1Offline
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PostPosted: 08-01-2014 22:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

There're plenty of nice tastes without loads of fat and salt.

I do use a bit of that lo-sodium 'salt' and have the occasional veggie fry-up with a spot of olive oil but thats about it.
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Naughty_FelidOffline
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PostPosted: 09-01-2014 02:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
Used to make my own bread every day in my gas oven, until I moved to a house with only electricity and it just wouldn't rise any more!

It is so easy to make that I came to feel that bread wants to be made. Cool


I have an electric oven too and that's why I tend to increase the temp 5-10 degrees or so.

Wish I had gas.
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