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Super Ape... or Feral Human?
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 29-11-2013 23:49    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those are Ona (Inland guanaco hunting folk)

They are not Yaghans. (costal seal and otter hunting folk)

Don't get the two mixed up or you will get an arrow in you.

And yes, they are wearing clothes, or merely a big skin robe wrapped around them, Patagonian fashion, they also had moccasins.

still pretty chilly.
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Xanatic_Offline
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PostPosted: 30-11-2013 01:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

That photo is from the annual Tierra del Fuego fashion show.

I was reading a book recently, where someone talked about how the aboriginal australians can survive chilly nights because they redirect all their bloodflow to the torso. Which means the rest of them can get quite cold without problems. It might well be wrong though.
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Isis177Offline
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PostPosted: 30-11-2013 02:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

On one of our trips in the outback a local guide told us that some years ago a group of aboriginals had slept the night in a freezer truck, got up the next morning and just shook the frost out of their hair.
I have no idea if it was true but can't some Tibetan monks survive in freezing conditions with very little clothing?
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stunevilleOffline
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PostPosted: 30-11-2013 06:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isis177 wrote:
.. I have no idea if it was true but can't some Tibetan monks survive in freezing conditions with very little clothing?

Yes - it's called "tumo". I've seen this demonstrated at an exhibition featuring authentic Shaolin monks: one, sat in the lotus position, dried out cotton sheets soaked in iced water that were then wrapped around him - with a cold air fan trained on him as well - within about 30 minutes with nary a shiver.

They did lots of other qi stuff too, much of it eye-watering and/or mind-boggling.
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 30-11-2013 10:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

stuneville wrote:
Isis177 wrote:
.. I have no idea if it was true but can't some Tibetan monks survive in freezing conditions with very little clothing?

Yes - it's called "tumo". I've seen this demonstrated at an exhibition featuring authentic Shaolin monks: one, sat in the lotus position, dried out cotton sheets soaked in iced water that were then wrapped around him - with a cold air fan trained on him as well - within about 30 minutes with nary a shiver.

They did lots of other qi stuff too, much of it eye-watering and/or mind-boggling.


You've seen it actually demonstrated? Shocked
I'd read about it, but didn't know for sure if it was truly possible.
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stunevilleOffline
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PostPosted: 30-11-2013 10:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
You've seen it actually demonstrated? Shocked
I'd read about it, but didn't know for sure if it was truly possible.

Oh yeah. The audience was invited to feel the water, to watch closely - it was all genuine. The monk was bare-chested. He was wound in the soaking sheet, the fan was switched on, and he just appeared to meditate. Before very long you could see dry patches appear on the material (and not just from the fan-ward direction, but all round) and as I said within half an hour or so it was dry and apparently warm to the touch, and stiff like something dried on a radiator.

As I said they did other stuff - like bending bars by holding each end between two monks' Adam's Apples who then walked toward one another, holding hugely contorted physical positions for minutes on end, etc, as well as more conventional Kung Fu stuff.

This was about twenty years ago, part of the Mind, Body and Spirit expo that was an annual thing in Bristol until a few years ago. Apparently the Shaolin do still tour.

edit - dug around a bit - it's "tummo" apparently - here's a report of a monk performing the sheet routine under the supervision of Harvard University professor of medicine.
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Quake42Offline
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PostPosted: 22-12-2013 23:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I was reading a book recently, where someone talked about how the aboriginal australians can survive chilly nights


I saw a documentary years ago which suggested that the Australian Aboriginals and a hypothetical pre-Indian population may have been the same people, and that the Fuegans were the last survivors of the original inhabitants of the Americas. Interesting then that both groups apparently have an unusual tolerance to cold.
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 23-12-2013 08:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

I saw that too, I only caught the end though. I seem to recall they identified one individual, a woman I think, as being the last of this group. They were saying that they were evidence of a very ancient seafaring culture.

I'm not sure what's special about Australian Aboriginals and cold nights though.
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Quake42Offline
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PostPosted: 23-12-2013 10:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I saw that too, I only caught the end though. I seem to recall they identified one individual, a woman I think, as being the last of this group.


Yes, and I think DNA evidence supported the theory. I think there had been a small group left but they were killed off with measles in the 1920s or thereabouts. It's a shame I can't remember what the documentary was called.

Quote:
I'm not sure what's special about Australian Aboriginals and cold nights though.


All I can think is the extremes of temperature in the Australia desert - although most of the Aboriginal population pre-European settlement lived very sensibly in the temperate regions of the continent.
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oldroverOffline
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PostPosted: 23-12-2013 16:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes that's the one, no idea what it was called or what channel it was on other than it was a terrestrial one.

The thing is desert temperatures are the same all over the tropics at night, it'd be just as bad for any hunter gatherer society.

This business of the Fuegan's ability to tolerate extreme cold is very interesting.
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skinnyOffline
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PostPosted: 24-12-2013 06:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quake42 wrote:

Quote:
I'm not sure what's special about Australian Aboriginals and cold nights though.


All I can think is the extremes of temperature in the Australia desert - although most of the Aboriginal population pre-European settlement lived very sensibly in the temperate regions of the continent.


Interestingly, those in the temperate areas tended to don skins of possum, kangaroo and koala. Those more centrally located made and continue to make use of of a combination of fire and dogs. Strip fires either side of the sleeper were stoked from time to time overnight, and dingoes huddled for mutual warmth (ever heard the phrase "three dog night"?). I tried the strip fire method one night in a sandy creekbed in the Flinders Ranges but felt so nervous about rolling in that I didn't get much sleep anyway. It did stave off the cold air pretty well, however.

Dingoes and Indigenous Culture
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