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Books from your Childhood
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DrWhitefaceOffline
Great Old One
Joined: 09 Jun 2010
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PostPosted: 20-11-2013 00:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Three Investigators!

Not exactly Fortean, since whatever the scam was, it was often an elaborate plot to commit some crime or other!

But how I loved those books!
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CarlosTheDJOffline
Dazed and confused for so long its not true
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PostPosted: 20-11-2013 09:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Weirdstone Of Brisingamen, The Machine Gunners and Devil On The Road were all part of our curriculum somewhere along the line...DOTR in particular stands out. I read that many, many times.....

I'm sure there was one called Blitz Cat? The Coventry bombings but told through the eyes of a moggy.....?
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 20-11-2013 18:21    Post subject: Reply with quote

You couldn't beat a Paddington book for entertainment. I still recall the one where he went to France and ate escargots, not knowing what they were.

Anyone remember Ye Olde Joke Book? A classic of the form, by the great Janet and Alan Ahlberg.
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PeniGOffline
Proud children's writer
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PostPosted: 21-11-2013 04:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blitz Cat is also Robert Westall. The cat's name is Lord Gort.
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CarlosTheDJOffline
Dazed and confused for so long its not true
Joined: 01 Feb 2007
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PostPosted: 21-11-2013 10:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

PeniG wrote:
Blitz Cat is also Robert Westall. The cat's name is Lord Gort.


Nice one thanks!
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SpookdaddyOffline
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PostPosted: 21-11-2013 12:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anything by Joan Aiken - The Wolves of Willoughby Chase which was read to me at school, is the first time I became conscious that books were something I should really get into. Straight after finishing that our teacher launched into The Weirdstone of Brisingamen, which confiirmed the matter - although I find the latter (the dialogue, certainly), a little stilted and hard to swallow now.

I always loved Wind in the Willows, and still do.

I was one of those children who became totally absorbed in whatever I was reading at the time, and quite upset when I finished something. I'd regularly read the same book two or three times in a row until I'd found something else to fill the gap.

I also remember really enjoying a book called The Power of Three, by Diana Wynne Jones - although I remember nothing much of it now.

Books from my childhood give me the same kind of instant flashbacks that I more ususally accociate with music; sometimes I'll open a book and reading a couple of lines, or looking at an illustration - sometimes nothing more than the general feel of the book - sends me back to some precise point in my childhood that I'd otherwise probably never have cause to revisit. It can be quite an odd feeling sometimes.
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titchagainOffline
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PostPosted: 21-11-2013 15:46    Post subject: Reply with quote

When i was very young i loved charlotte's web, it was the first book that really moved me. After that i really got into the famous 5 (and the secret 7, if i didn't just make them up..never heard of them since) I found a famous five book up the attic when i was in my mid 20's and tried to read it again. sometimes its best not to look back.
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FluttermothOffline
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PostPosted: 21-11-2013 16:07    Post subject: Reply with quote

You definitely haven't imagined the Secret Seven; I liked them better than the Famous Five, who I never really took to.

The very best of Blyton's 'detective' series is the 'Five Find-Outers', IMHO, although the 'Adventure' ones are good too; 'Ship of Adventure' is my favourite of those Smile
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MonstrosaOffline
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PostPosted: 21-11-2013 18:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Willard Price "Adventure" books, the Phantom Tollbooth, "The Phantom Tollbooth" by Norton Juster, The Earthsea Cycle by Ursula K. Le Guin.
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liveinabin1Offline
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PostPosted: 21-11-2013 22:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fluttermoth wrote:
You definitely haven't imagined the Secret Seven; I liked them better than the Famous Five, who I never really took to.

The very best of Blyton's 'detective' series is the 'Five Find-Outers', IMHO, although the 'Adventure' ones are good too; 'Ship of Adventure' is my favourite of those Smile


I preferred the Famous Five, but I certainly remember the Secret Seven. I agree though that the Adventure books were better still.
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Pinlight_DukeOffline
Yeti
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PostPosted: 22-11-2013 04:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

Goodness, for me the books that continue to haunt me are Madeleine L'Engle's books, such as A Wrinkle in Time. When I read them in elementary school they shaped my ideas of time and space, and probably led to my early interest in cosmology and physics (I studied physics in university), not to mention metaphysics.

Not quite as profound but certainly meaningful were John Bellairs's awfully-fun dark mystery books, illustrated by Edward Gorey. Hidden passages and overgrown tombstones and haunted mansions with clues planted inside, that kind of thing. Sort of like Da Vinci code for the younger set and not nearly as serious. Great fun.

Also, Diana Wynne Jones's The Time of the Ghost left a deep impression on me when I was a kid, and I recently discovered it online after trying for years to remember what it was. Quite a surprise to discover that it was written by this great author.
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PeripartOffline
is still wondering
Joined: 01 Aug 2005
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PostPosted: 22-11-2013 11:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

DrWhiteface wrote:
The Three Investigators!

Not exactly Fortean, since whatever the scam was, it was often an elaborate plot to commit some crime or other!

But how I loved those books!

Ah, yes, I remember those very well. Must have had about 20 or more of them at one time. Great tales for kids. IIRC, the real mystery was who wrote them - the author's (or authors', as I'm sure there were several) name(s) were hardly to be spotted anywhere.

Spookdaddy wrote:
I also remember really enjoying a book called The Power of Three, by Diana Wynne Jones - although I remember nothing much of it now.

Wow! Another synapse triggered for the first time in ages. Wasn't that the one about the (non-identical) twin who spots his double at a fair?

There are books from primary school which I vaguely recall, but no-one else remembers. Actually, the 3 pirates have been mentioned here before (you know, the red, green and blue ones), but I also have slightly disturbing memories of stories involving molemen. Does this ring any bells? The weren't moles, but men with the heads of moles, who lived and worked deep underground. Maybe the pirates encountered them, maybe it was something else altogether...
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dreenessOffline
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PostPosted: 22-11-2013 14:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

Embarassed

When I was young basically I would read anything with a scary picture on the cover. So, a lot of monster-ish comic books, also at the time there were vending machines that sold tiny books on a variety of scary topics, I read a lot of those.

One actual young persons book I remember reading was "Lost In The Barrens" by Farley Mowat. It was about two kids who accidentally become separated from their party during a canoe expedition, and have to survive in the frozen north as winter closes in.
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SpookdaddyOffline
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PostPosted: 22-11-2013 14:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd forgotten about The Eagle of the Ninth, which I re-read several times. And when I was a bit younger I loved the Professor Branestawm books.

Peripart wrote:
Spookdaddy wrote:
I also remember really enjoying a book called The Power of Three, by Diana Wynne Jones - although I remember nothing much of it now.

Wow! Another synapse triggered for the first time in ages. Wasn't that the one about the (non-identical) twin who spots his double at a fair?...


I'm really not sure - all I remember is that it contained three characters with different powers. I seem to remember that it was set in a moorland landscape, and that this was quite a feature of the book; I probably connected with this as I was lucky enough to live on the edge of just such a place, which I spent many hours exploring, even when I was pretty young. In fact I used to relate virtually everything I read to places I actually knew, which kind of made them more magical - and sometimes more scary, I suppose. (I was very lucky in this aspect, because I was brought up in the Peak District - an area with a very varied landscape, in which I could always find a place to imagine whatever book I was reading.)

Funnily enough, I stumbled across my old copy of the novel in a box of old books a few weeks back - I'll have to dig it out.
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PeripartOffline
is still wondering
Joined: 01 Aug 2005
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PostPosted: 22-11-2013 16:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spookdaddy wrote:
Peripart wrote:
Spookdaddy wrote:
I also remember really enjoying a book called The Power of Three, by Diana Wynne Jones - although I remember nothing much of it now.

Wow! Another synapse triggered for the first time in ages. Wasn't that the one about the (non-identical) twin who spots his double at a fair?...

I'm really not sure - all I remember is that it contained three characters with different powers. I seem to remember that it was set in a moorland landscape...


OK - after a quick Google, it seems that I was thinking of The Shape of Three by Lilith Norman! Another good read, if my memory serves me.
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