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Books from your Childhood
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skinnyOffline
Roaring Fortean
Joined: 30 May 2010
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PostPosted: 22-11-2013 16:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

Monstrosa wrote:
The Willard Price "Adventure" books
This, The Robber Hotzenplotz and Whizzer n Chips distracted me from the real literature promoted on the thread. It was pretty good stuff at 7, 8, 9 and 10.
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Spudrick68Offline
Great Old One
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PostPosted: 22-11-2013 22:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stig Of The Dump. I personally read The Phantom Tolbooth as a kid and loved it. My wife lived in Tasmania as a kid, and she told me that it was taught at school there. So she bought me a new copy a couple of years ago. If you haven't read it, I'd recommend that you do. Even as an adult.
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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PostPosted: 27-11-2013 18:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not one from my childhood but from somebody's, no doubt.

Betsy Ross and her tool!

Join the dots and see. Shocked
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GingerTabbyOffline
Yeti
Joined: 20 Nov 2012
Total posts: 87
Location: all lost in the supermarket
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PostPosted: 28-11-2013 21:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Tiger Who Came To Tea was a favourite book of mine when I was a young child. I hadn't thought about it in years until I spotted this article a few days ago:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25027090
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bunnymousekittOnline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 10:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spookdaddy wrote:
Anything by Joan Aiken - The Wolves of Willoughby Chase which was read to me at school, is the first time I became conscious that books were something I should really get into. Straight after finishing that our teacher launched into The Weirdstone of Brisingamen, which confiirmed the matter - although I find the latter (the dialogue, certainly), a little stilted and hard to swallow now.

I always loved Wind in the Willows, and still do.

I was one of those children who became totally absorbed in whatever I was reading at the time, and quite upset when I finished something. I'd regularly read the same book two or three times in a row until I'd found something else to fill the gap.

I also remember really enjoying a book called The Power of Three, by Diana Wynne Jones - although I remember nothing much of it now.

Books from my childhood give me the same kind of instant flashbacks that I more ususally accociate with music; sometimes I'll open a book and reading a couple of lines, or looking at an illustration - sometimes nothing more than the general feel of the book - sends me back to some precise point in my childhood that I'd otherwise probably never have cause to revisit. It can be quite an odd feeling sometimes.


Ah, nice, Spooks! You hit on three of my favorite children's authors. Very Happy

I loved the Wind in the Willows too. It inspired a dreamy sort of paganism in me as a child when I found it in the library at my Catholic school. I wonder what the nuns would have thought if they'd known the effect it was having!

The Joan Aiken book that I remember best was Died on a Rainy Sunday. The book was in the school library (the public school, not the Catholic one) and I had to work up the courage to read it, as the cover illustration - an umbrella dripping blood - was unnerving.

When I did read it, it put me in the mind of these scary British movies they played on Friday nights (which I now know was actually a series called "Thriller") I could easily imagine it being staged the same way. Eerie. Come to think of it, it's hard to believe that book was in an elementary school library!

Another book I read repeatedly (despite being terrified of it) was a collection of supernatural folk tales from the Ozark mountains called Tales of Terror, by Ida Chittum.

This site has some nice scans of the illustrations, which were also pretty nightmarish, IMO:
http://the-haunted-closet.blogspot.com/2008/11/tales-of-terror-1975-ida-chittum.html

Interestingly, one of the commenters on that blog post is the author's daughter, who mentions that one of the most frightening stories in the book (regarding two children witnessing a spectral reenactment of murder) was based on her mother's personal experience.

On a (slightly) lighter note, there was the Maria Leach classic The Thing at the Foot of the Bed. Aside from all the great tales, there was an addendum at the back, "signs of ghosts" and "how to see ghosts", which my friends and I all followed religiously. Laughing

the latter two books no doubt had a lot to do with developing my interest in folktales later in life.
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GinandoOffline
Great Old One
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 11:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a child, I loved the Famous Five books. The fizzy pop and cake picnics sounded amazing. We used to try to copy their antics, following people without being seen and so on. Probably get an ASBO if we did that now.

I then moved on to stories such as The Coral island by R M Ballantyne.

I was about 12 and on holiday with my parents in Oban, and we were in a bookshop when I saw a book which would define my reading choices for years to come. The Palace of Eternity, by Bob Shaw. I read that book in a day. I just couldn't put it down. I went back to the shop where the very kindly owner suggested if I liked that possibly I would enjoy Arthur C Clarke, and sold me a copy of The City and the Stars and threw in a copy of The Other Side of the Sky free of charge. I was utterly hooked and still have all three books 40 something years later.
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 11:52    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't have many books from my childhood left in my possession, but recently my parents had a clear-out and found a few items I'd left there:

Countdown Annuals 1 and 2 (in immaculate condition). Should be collector's items but don't fetch much these days.
3 books by cartoonist Harry Hargreaves - The Bird Set, Bird for All Seasons and Birds of a Feather.
The Complete Book of Outer Space circa 1953, complete with wondrous old book smell.
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 11:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Coral Island is a strange one. It was the class reading book in my first year at grammar school. Either we were an innocent lot or we were given an edited version. When I acquired an uncut text, I was astonished by the amount of kissing which went on between the lads. It was published in 1858 and is probably an unselfconscious account of male bonding suitable for future empire-builders!

The recipient of most of the man-love is the highly annoying 13-year-old Peterkin Gay. I doubt if The Coral Island features much in schools today. Golding took the names of Ralph and Jack for his own island dystopia, substituting violence for the colonial romance. Cool
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 12:01    Post subject: Reply with quote

JamesWhitehead wrote:
The recipient of most of the man-love is the highly annoying 13-year-old Peterkin Gay.


Appropriate name... Laughing
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 12:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:

Countdown Annuals 1 and 2 (in immaculate condition). Should be collector's items but don't fetch much these days.
.


I loved that comic.
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YithianOffline
Keeping the British end up
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 13:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spudrick68 wrote:
Stig Of The Dump. I personally read The Phantom Tolbooth as a kid and loved it. My wife lived in Tasmania as a kid, and she told me that it was taught at school there. So she bought me a new copy a couple of years ago. If you haven't read it, I'd recommend that you do. Even as an adult.


Stig of the Dump is a very good book.
The Phantom Tollbooth struck me as a not-that-interesting Lewis Caroll rip-off.
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Tunn11Offline
Yeti
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 14:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

For me it has to be William - originally written for adults of course. As a child I never noticed lines like: "The young man liked children, probably because he didn't know many." They have courted some controversy lately, after all they were originally written about ninety years ago when attitudes were different but for me William and the nasties is taking a swipe at fascism from the early thirties.

When a bit older,
Edgar Rice Burroughs - forget the screen Tarzans, John Carters, etc. the books are better quite variable in quality but some well paced and crafted.

Eric Frank Russell. Wasp & Next of Kin are both a good read but With a strange device and Dreadful sanctuary have truly Fortean themes.
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OneWingedBirdOffline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 16:48    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only book I read when I was growing up that I still own my original copy of is Edward Bryan's Cinnabar.

Doesn't seem to either be an author or a title that people have a lot of love for, although it made quite an impression on me.
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 18:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Nigel Molesworth books were great favourites for me, even though I had no personal experience of 1950s public schools they were hilarious.
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MythopoeikaOffline
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PostPosted: 17-12-2013 19:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

gncxx wrote:
The Nigel Molesworth books were great favourites for me, even though I had no personal experience of 1950s public schools they were hilarious.


That's another one! I used to have a first edition 'Down With Skool' book featuring Molesworth (as any fule kno).
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