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Books from your Childhood
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dreenessOffline
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PostPosted: 18-12-2013 06:36    Post subject: Reply with quote

bunnymousekitt wrote:
I loved the Wind in the Willows too. It inspired a dreamy sort of paganism in me as a child when I found it in the library at my Catholic school. I wonder what the nuns would have thought if they'd known the effect it was having!


That's like what Zizek said about Tolkien, "Only a devout Christian could have imagined such a magnificent pagan universe."
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sherbetbizarreOffline
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PostPosted: 22-12-2013 20:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

On BBC4 tonight at 9...

Quote:
The Ladybird Books Story: How Britain Got the Reading Bug

To millions of people, Ladybird books were as much a part of childhood as battery-powered torches and warm school milk. These now iconic pocket-sized books once informed us on such diverse subjects as how magnets work, what to look for in winter and how to make decorations out of old eggshells. But they also helped to teach many of us to read via a unique literacy scheme known as 'key words'. Ladybird books were also a visual treat - some of the best-known contemporary illustrators were recruited to provide images which today provide a perfect snapshot of the lost world of Ladybirdland: a place that is forever the gloriously ordinary, orderly 1950s.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03mp53s
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escargot1Offline
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PostPosted: 22-12-2013 22:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

We enjoyed that programme. Very Happy

Must say, I was never a fan as I seemed to grow out of them very quickly. They didn't offer me enough solid reading after I was about 7. By then I was onto encyclopaedias! Laughing
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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PostPosted: 23-12-2013 00:09    Post subject: Reply with quote

They have become an industry in the last few years - a design classic, redolent of steam trains and red pillar boxes. Like escargot, I recall them well - wasn't Ladybird also a brand of kids' clothes? Not sure if this was an early attempt to surround us with bugs or independent firms operating in what were then different markets. Question
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PeripartOffline
is still wondering
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PostPosted: 23-12-2013 09:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peripart wrote:
There are books from primary school which I vaguely recall, but no-one else remembers. Actually, the 3 pirates have been mentioned here before (you know, the red, green and blue ones), but I also have slightly disturbing memories of stories involving molemen. Does this ring any bells? The weren't moles, but men with the heads of moles, who lived and worked deep underground. Maybe the pirates encountered them, maybe it was something else altogether...

Now I'm really scared - a month on, and no-one else will admit to remembering those horribly creepy anthropomorphic moles. Either I made them up, or you've all managed to shut out the traumatic memory.

And don't get me started on the god-awful Duckbo in a story I once read - haunted my young dreams for a while, did that one...
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 23-12-2013 22:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

That Ladybird doc was great, those meticulously painted illustrations are incredibly evocative. Bit disappointed Tootles the Taxi didn't merit a mention, though.
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HenryFortOffline
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PostPosted: 26-12-2013 23:25    Post subject: Reply with quote

my dad had a fondness for ken follett robert ludlum and ray bradbury ... I remember a paperback of the illustrated man that I snaffled from the bookshelf and dug into ... I think it was the one with rod steiger on the cover and I would say I was about 12 or 13 ... there was one story in there that reduced me to tears somehow even at that age ... I remember reading the same story over and over every night first in an effort to finish it without crying then to try and discover what it actually was that was affecting me ... no idea which story it was now although it could have been something about a boy rushing to get home before something terrible happened ... ray bradbury RIP ... I liked the non-sci-fi best eg those funny drunken irish tales or did I imagine them ?
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Tunn11Offline
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PostPosted: 10-01-2014 12:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mythopoeika wrote:
gncxx wrote:
The Nigel Molesworth books were great favourites for me, even though I had no personal experience of 1950s public schools they were hilarious.


That's another one! I used to have a first edition 'Down With Skool' book featuring Molesworth (as any fule kno).


Have you read "Molesworth rites again" by Simon Brett & illustrated by Willie Rushton? published in 1983 it is about Nigel M in middle age. Not as good as the originals IMO but still worth a look. I'd never heard of it but saw a copy in a secondhand bookshop a couple of years ago.
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 10-01-2014 18:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, I haven't, though I would have hoped Molesworth would have learned to spell by 1983...
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ruffreadyOffline
Ruff says..
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PostPosted: 07-02-2014 09:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom Swift book series

Got me hooked on reading books

And of course anything with dinosaurs from the library.

The Time machine H.G. Wells, was the first book I bought off the book mobile that came around our elementary school.
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ramonmercadoOnline
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PostPosted: 08-02-2014 00:51    Post subject: Reply with quote

ruffready wrote:
Tom Swift book series

Got me hooked on reading books

And of course anything with dinosaurs from the library.

The Time machine H.G. Wells, was the first book I bought off the book mobile that came around our elementary school.


Me too! At age 8 I got Tom Swift And His Giant Robot, never looked back. Also was an early Wells fan. I might have read War of the Worlds first.
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sherbetbizarreOffline
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PostPosted: 03-03-2014 00:18    Post subject: Reply with quote

There might be a better thread for this, but I'll put it here for now...

Quote:
Artist's spoof Ladybird book provokes wrath of Penguin

Publisher tells Miriam Elia to stop selling satire in which Peter and Jane grapple with Tracey Emin-style conceptual art

An artist and comedian has been told by the publisher Penguin that her new satirical art book breaches its copyright, and if she continues to sell copies it could use the courts to seize the books and have them pulped.

Miriam Elia, who has her own comedy series, A Series Of Psychotic Episodes, on BBC Radio 4 and has had a number of short segments on Channel 4, had produced a spoof version of the Ladybird books from the 60s. Generations of British children fondly remember these works, which famously portrayed the daily lives of Mummy, Peter and Jane as an introduction to reading and writing for young children.

Elia's version sees them visiting an exhibition at a modern art gallery and grappling with existential questions about the nature of Tracey Emin-style conceptualist work, much of it peppered with distinctly adult imagery.

Elia, an accomplished artist who trained at the Royal College of Art and has shown in a number of prestigious galleries, produced all the pictures in the book, We Go to the Gallery, herself. Some she painted, while some were collages made from scenes cut from old Ladybird books.

She had a brief initial run of 1,000 books printed privately and has been selling them for £20 each. But Penguin, which owns the Ladybird imprint, contacted Elia, saying that her work breached its copyright. The company has told Elia that it will allow her one month to sell enough books to cover her costs, but any more have to be destroyed.

"I had the idea two years ago," said Elia. "I wanted to do a satirical version of those old I-Spy books from the 60s where you're supposed to tick off everything you see but they're really predictable. Then, because I collect Ladybird books, the two things came together, and the first image I composed was the 'God is dead' image."

The page depicts an empty room, in which Mummy introduces Peter and Jane to a severe form of Nietzschean nihilism.

Another page pokes fun at the giant inflatable animals that the artist and former Wall Street commodities broker Jeff Koons is famous – or infamous – for. Koons's Balloon Dog (Orange) became the most expensive artwork by a living person when it was sold at auction for $58.4m (£35m) last November.

Mummy, Peter and Jane all stare nonplussed at a huge red balloon dog that appears to have been created by a manic children's party clown. "I want to play with the balloon!" declares Peter. "Only venture capitalists can play with this balloon," replies Mummy.

"I got really into the books," said Elia. "I bought them all and started copying them. I learnt to paint the style and just got hooked."

Asked who would buy the books, she said: "Definitely not children. I never really think about the target audience. I just make things and hope people like them.

"Kids might like the books, though there are lots of rude things in them, but then there are rude things in so much of contemporary art. There's no swearing but there are paintings of a penis or vagina because most stuff in modern art galleries is explicit. Every day thousands of schoolchildren go to Tate Modern and they see that anyway."

Penguin contacted her last month to complain. "It was a bit of a shock. I never really thought about copyright," she said. "Artists just respond to the world in your little room and you're not thinking about much else. You just think: 'Oh, this will be great!'"

She stressed that Penguin has been sympathetic and has been open to negotiation, but ultimately would not back down on what it saw as infringement of its copyright.

"I've been talking to them a lot and suggesting ways around the problem. And they do understand. There's no malice, but it's harsh because they can destroy the work. I just want it to be appreciated. It was supposed to be an homage to Ladybird – and a bit of a satirical comment on the art world, I suppose."

A spokeswoman for Penguin said: "We are in discussions with the artist. While we respect her artistic rights, we take our copyright and our trademark rights very seriously – not least around our Ladybird brand which has been developed over many years to help very young children to read."

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/mar/02/artist-ladybird-book-penguin-copyright-miriam-elia

And some NSFW pages...

http://www.cobgallery.com/?attachment_id=5168
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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PostPosted: 03-03-2014 00:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

We might expect artists to launch out into worlds of their own.

Begin from a place of your own and you are condemned as Ivory Tower.

Launching from a recognized spot is, however, likely to provoke a stampede of writs. Sad
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PeniGOffline
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PostPosted: 03-03-2014 05:24    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's the collaging of cut up pages from the books that's getting her into trouble. She does not own the rights to those images or any words that get into the art, either. She needs permission. Nor does she have rights to the characters.

If she restricts herself to drawing in a recognizabe Ladybird style and uses near-miss names, she'll be able to carry on.

Artists should understand the principles of intellectual property better than that. But Andy Warhol never compensated Kirby et al for the images he ripped off from their comics, so she's following a bad example.
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PeteByrdieOffline
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PostPosted: 03-03-2014 08:58    Post subject: Reply with quote

Miriam Elia wrote:
 I never really thought about copyright. Artists just respond to the world in your little room and you're not thinking about much else. 


She's so dedicated to her art, it's just inspiring! Also, this is nonsense. Of course artists consider copyright and intellectual property. She was taking a chance that she could sell few enough to slip under the radar. She failed!
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