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Experimental Travel
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rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 04-06-2005 08:12    Post subject: Experimental Travel Reply with quote

From World Wide Words newsletter:

Experimental Travel
-------------------------------------------------------------------
The phrase is in the news because Lonely Planet yesterday published
its Guide to Experimental Travel. One author is Joel Henry, a 48-
year-old television scriptwriter from Strasbourg who is said to
have created the idea in 1990 (though the term is more recent).
It's also called "experimental tourism". As a surreal alternative
to the standard trudge round tourist venues, he suggests that you
should "challenge your perceptions of a city and increase your
receptiveness as a tourist" by trying alternative ways of seeing.
Alphatourism, for example: identify the first and last streets in
the A-Z, draw a line between the two and follow the route on foot
(a variation might be to draw a random shape, superimpose it on a
street plan and follow the route it marks out). Or aerotourism:
spend a day in an airport enjoying its facilities without going
anywhere. Or nyctalotourism: go to a foreign city at twilight, look
around all night and leave just before dawn. Or cecitourism: let a
trusted friend or partner walk you blindfolded round a place,
describing the sights. If all these are too mundane, you might try
"horse's head tourism": don a horse's head costume and walk around
to experience the way that people react to you.

* From the Independent, 9 Feb. 2005: About 20 miles further on, I
drive past Bodiam Castle, a 14th-century fortification. This, of
course, is a conventional tourist attraction, but experimental
tourists are permitted to visit such places, as long as they
indulge in contretourism. This involves turning your back on the
monument in question and taking a photograph of the view in the
opposite direction.

* From the Observer, 22 May 2005: "You see," he says. "That is the
thing about doing experimental tourism, it gives you a special
feeling. It makes you into a person you are not." I think about
this but I don't think I'm sure enough of the person I am to know
that I'm not the person I'm not. But then, this is precisely the
kind of topsy-turvy conundrum that experimental tourism throws up
the whole time.
_______________________________________________________

Sounds pretty Fortean to me!

Another variation is something I sometimes do. I catch the first bus that comes along, buy an all day ticket, and if the bus happens to take me to a bus station, I then get the first bus leaving there. So I get a random, unplanned tour of the county, and sometimes get to places I'd never have thought of visiting.

(It backfired though a couple of weeks ago - I usually intersperse the bus rides with walks, and this time I'd walked a few miles to a small village, intending to catch another bus from there. But when I got there I realised this place had very few buses per day, and I'd never catch my last bus home, so I had to take a taxi back to the nearest town! Still, that's experimental travel for you!)
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rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 07-06-2005 23:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh well, I guess I'll have to try to keep this thread going on my own. Rolling Eyes

Had to go for a hospital appointment today, so my destination was fixed, but my route was not, as I had time to spare and alternative routes. The buses for the two alternative routes come through here at the same time (according to the time table) so it's a lottery which turns up first. I took the first one that came.

On the way home, for various reasons, I ended up walking about 6 miles in total (nice to know the old pins can stick hack it!), and passed a sign set in the roadside hedge, parallel to the road, and at least a mile from the nearest village, naming it 'Horsepond Road'. This is not mentioned on any map I have, and I guess 99% of motorists barely notice the sign as they whizz by, let alone have time to read it, so that's a little discovery for Experimental Travel! Very Happy
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_Lizard23_Offline
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Joined: 23 Aug 2001
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PostPosted: 08-06-2005 07:30    Post subject: Reply with quote

I sort of do this. I've done the random bus thing many times, but these days it is more often 'random roads' when out on the bike ...... 'wonder where this goes....?'.
You can also choose to visit a sequence of unlikely destinations, the getting there being more important than the destination itself but the type of destination leading to going to new places consistantly .... I used to go and visit television and radio masts for example .... not interested in them particularly but there are plenty of them about.
I'm currently considering a grand tour of pubs called 'The Red Lion' as it is supposedly the most frequent pub name in england and so should be a fairly long and interesting project.
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escargot1Offline
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Location: Farkham Hall
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PostPosted: 08-06-2005 07:44    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have several Red Lions locally so I look forward to a pint of t'best with Lizard.

I tried a form of experimental travel around Eastern Europe last year, what with a. having very little money and b. not speaking any useful language there. Rolling Eyes
Had a great time! Saw some wonderful art and travelled on some truly awful public transport. And very cold it was too.
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rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 08-06-2005 21:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today I 'discovered' a disused railway line, by taking a new bus route.

The bus went over an old style railway bridge, but there was no sign of a railway. But checking on a map later, I found there had been a spur line linking the main Cornish railway line with the town of Helston - which was news to me, despite my interest in local history!
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rjmrjmrjmOffline
Professional Surrealist
Joined: 25 Feb 2004
Total posts: 1486
Location: Behind your eyes...
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PostPosted: 08-06-2005 21:53    Post subject: Reply with quote

Random Busing is great fun. As is getting a random bus to its terminus then walking home. Great fun until the bus you're on terminates in a council estate in Speke.
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rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 27-03-2006 07:24    Post subject: Re: Experimental Travel Reply with quote

In the first post here, I wrote
rynner wrote:
I catch the first bus that comes along, buy an all day ticket, and if the bus happens to take me to a bus station, I then get the first bus leaving there. So I get a random, unplanned tour of the county, and sometimes get to places I'd never have thought of visiting.

(It backfired though a couple of weeks ago - I usually intersperse the bus rides with walks, and this time I'd walked a few miles to a small village, intending to catch another bus from there. But when I got there I realised this place had very few buses per day, and I'd never catch my last bus home, so I had to take a taxi back to the nearest town! Still, that's experimental travel for you!)

Yesterday, I phoned my mother (as you do!), and mentioned that I and other holders of Cornish bus cards will get free bus travel from the beginning of next month.

My mother then said that my grandfather sometimes went to the bus station and caught the first bus out, etc, a fact I didn't previously know. Although possibly he may have told me about it when I was a kid, but then I forgot it.

Either way, it seems like Experimental Travel is a family tradition - or maybe it's in the genes! Cool

And with free travel on the buses soon, I'll be continuing it! Very Happy
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rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 28-10-2006 17:03    Post subject: Re: Experimental Travel Reply with quote

rynner wrote:
Yesterday, I phoned my mother (as you do!), and mentioned that I and other holders of Cornish bus cards will get free bus travel from the beginning of next month.

My mother then said that my grandfather sometimes went to the bus station and caught the first bus out, etc, a fact I didn't previously know. Although possibly he may have told me about it when I was a kid, but then I forgot it.

Either way, it seems like Experimental Travel is a family tradition - or maybe it's in the genes! Cool

And with free travel on the buses soon, I'll be continuing it! Very Happy

..as I did today. Despite the foul weather, I needed a day out, so I played the bus lottery again and ended up in Helston. Walking down the street I spied a cannon which I had recently seen in a 1968 slide of mine, so I knew it was outside the town museum. That seemed a good place to visit on a rainy day, so I did - and was very pleasantly surprised.

Much more than just a few B&W photos and dull cabinets of fragments of this and that - there was loads of interesting stuff to see, including a big granite apple mill, and a huge wooden cider press, worked by big apple-wood screws about a foot in diameter!

To an ex-coastguard, the early rocket line-throwing gear was interesting too, but perhaps most surprising were a couple of hand powered vacuum cleaners!

Entry is free on Saturdays, so I recommend a visit to those of you within reach. As an added incentive, the pub opposite, the Red Lion, does a good selection of wine, beer (I had some excellent Abbot Ale), and lager, and provides free nibbles on the bar (tapas, if you want to feel posh!)

I finished off with a pint of Spingo down at the Blue Anchor, which was also an excellent pint. (Although in the past Spingo and I have not agreed.)

But when I left home this morning, I had no more idea of going to Helston than of flying to the moon! Very Happy
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rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 28-10-2006 21:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just put a new pic of the Helston cannon on my computer.
And it shows Orbs! Are these the ghosts of drowned sailors from HMS Anson...?

Well, yes, it was raining, since you ask.
And yes, the flash did go off...

Wink
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escargot1Offline
Joined: 24 Aug 2001
Total posts: 18635
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PostPosted: 29-10-2006 07:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the subject of OAPS travelling free on buses, the comedian Tom O'Connor reckons that pensioners in Liverpool have long been known as Twirlies.

This because as the free travel starts at a certain time in the morning, OAPs at the bus stop wave their free passes at he driver and ask 'Am I too early?' which with Scouse pronunciation and intonation becomes 'I'm a Twirly!'
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rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 29-10-2006 07:47    Post subject: Reply with quote

escargot1 wrote:
This because as the free travel starts at a certain time in the morning, OAPs at the bus stop wave their free passes at he driver and ask 'Am I too early?' which with Scouse pronunciation and intonation becomes 'I'm a Twirly!'

Ha ha!

But no time limits here, happily! Very Happy
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rynner
Location: Still above sea level
Gender: Male
PostPosted: 22-04-2007 07:40    Post subject: Reply with quote

I didn't plan to play the Bus Lottery yesterday, but got taken for a ride anyway.....

I'd decided to visit Zennor, via Penzance, yesterday. To get the 0900 bus from Falmouth, I had to leave home at 0800, so I had time to get some money out, and shop for nibbles to take with me. Then I read the paper while waiting. Eventually a bus came along, empty, and the driver sat reading his paper with the doors closed. I assumed when departure time drew near he'd change the destination board and let pasengers on.

Just before 0900 he moved the bus down to the front of the stand, but still didn't seem inclined to get going. Another bus left from the stand behind me, and only when it swung round the little roundabout to head out did I see that that was the Penzance bus I should have been on! It had left from the wrong stand, and as the next one was not till 1100 that scuppered my plans. I consoled myself with a fried breakfast nearby, then caught the next bus out, heading to Truro.

But I wanted now to do something different, so I got off at Playing Place, walked to King Harry Ferry, crossed the Fal, and carried on to a village called Philleigh. I'd hoped to find another bus there, but it seemed I'd found somewhere about three light years from any bus route, so carried on (after a couple of pints) to Ruan High Lanes. Fifteen minutes to have a late lunch, and a bus to St Mawes came along, so I took that. But when I realised I'd have to wait two hours there for the next bus, I got back on board and made my way home via Truro, as by then I was well knackered. (I'm out of condition, after my recent accidents, and I'd already walked at least 6 miles, up and down hill, on a very warm day.)

The only map I'd had with me was for west of home, not east, and I didn't have the full bus time-table either, as I didn't expect to need it out Land's End way. If I'd had all that info, I doubt I'd have set off on the walk I did do! Looking at the maps later, I'd definitely have made other choices too.
http://tinyurl.com/2ykdy7

Anyway, had a very good sleep last night, and am only slightly achey today, so I think I'll live!
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AMPHIARAUS
PostPosted: 22-04-2007 11:10    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a variation I do on my motorbike. I just follow my nose off the main roads and deliberately get lost.

You find all sorts of places, which delight or depress but always suprise you. Little villages or even towns where you would least expect. The villages always seem to prosperous with an influx of new money but the odd towns in the middle of nowhere seem to be in a grey state of decline and often have a miasma of doom hanging over them.

Sometimes it gets a bit spooky as you try to find them again and fail. There's one place which I know for sure is within 5 miles of home, to the north east of town but I just cannot locate it again on map or by driving.
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Pietro_Mercurios
Heuristically Challenged
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PostPosted: 22-04-2007 11:13    Post subject: Reply with quote

AMPHIARAUS wrote:
I have a variation I do on my motorbike. I just follow my nose off the main roads and deliberately get lost.

You find all sorts of places, which delight or depress but always suprise you. Little villages or even towns where you would least expect. The villages always seem to prosperous with an influx of new money but the odd towns in the middle of nowhere seem to be in a grey state of decline and often have a miasma of doom hanging over them.

Sometimes it gets a bit spooky as you try to find them again and fail. There's one place which I know for sure is within 5 miles of home, to the north east of town but I just cannot locate it again on map or by driving.

I used to do that, years back, for the short time I had my motorbike. Only, I used to do it with pubs. Hence, the falling off the motorbike a lot, on the way back.

It works almost as well with a bicycle, though.
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Pietro_Mercurios
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PostPosted: 22-04-2007 11:20    Post subject: Reply with quote

rynner wrote:
...

Anyway, had a very good sleep last night, and am only slightly achey today, so I think I'll live!

You definitely need to think about doing it a bit more often Rynner! It's got to be good for you and you're living in one of the most brilliant pieces of Britain for pubs, scenery, archaeology and food.

A free bus pass and the whole of Devon & Cornwall within your reach! You lucky, lucky &^%#^*((! Laughing

Make sure you take plenty of liquids, some reading, an mp3 player, a sun hat and etc. with you, in a small backpack, next time. Wink
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