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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 07-03-2013 23:50    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Stowaway cat in 2,200-mile journey from Egypt
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-21697854

The cat has to stay in quarantine

A cat survived a 2,200 mile flight from Egypt hidden in its unwitting owner's suitcase.

Bisou, a Persian, climbed into her owner's bag in Cairo as she was packing for a trip to visit her sister in Nottinghamshire.

It was only when owner Mervat Ciuiti was in a cab on the M1 that she realised her pet had come with her.

Bisou survived the flight in the hold unscathed but is now staying at a quarantine centre in Derbyshire.

'Perfectly happy'
The seven-year-old cat had to endure the freezing temperatures in the cargo hold on the five-hour flight.

Her owner, who was heading from London to Radcliffe-on-Trent. only found out when a relative rang to say Bisou was missing and she thought the cat might be with her.

She made the taxi driver pull over so she could check and was delighted to find the cat curled up inside unharmed.

But because of Egyptian animal laws she cannot return home for six months, while UK rules says Bisou must stay in quarantine.

She has now settled in happily at Calagran Kennels in Chesterfield, Derbyshire.

Calagran owner Mike Binks said: "She is a Persian cat, so very laid back and perfectly happy. She was a bit timid at first but is doing very well now. I think it's harder for the owner.

"If all goes to plan she should be reunited with her owner by the end of May."
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 21-08-2013 09:43    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rutland ospreys: Back from the verge of extinction

A groundbreaking project to reintroduce the majestic osprey to central England is toasting its success.
Established in the 1990s, the Rutland Water Osprey Project was the first of its kind in Europe and it is hoped the birds of prey will now colonise neighbouring counties.

This year's young fledglings will soon make their first long distant flight - migrating thousands of miles to the west coast of Africa.

Here, Tim Mackrill explains the work done at the reservoir and tells the extraordinary tale of how they tracked one Rutland bird to a remote mountain in the Sahara desert using GPS technology.

[Videoslide show - great pictures and story.]

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-23684463
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 17-09-2013 22:14    Post subject: Reply with quote

An unusual story. This first surfaced in the local press as a case of callous cruelty, and a reward was offered to find the culprits. But it seems the truth may have been somewhat different:

Kittens thrown from car in Cornwall was 'tragic accident'

Two kittens allegedly thrown from a car and hit by traffic actually fell in a "tragic accident", police say.

Officers from Devon and Cornwall Police were told in August that the animals were thrown from a red VW Golf on the Penryn bypass heading towards Falmouth.
But after a witness came forward, police found the kittens had "fallen" from the engine compartment.
A police spokesman said: "No criminal action by any individual took place and this case is now closed."

The incident was alleged to have happened on 28 August and an appeal was made by police.
"A female came forward stating that she drives a similar car and can be put in the area at the time," the police spokesman added.
"She lives on a farm which has several feral cats and having returned from her journey she could hear a cat calling from within her car.
"A kitten was located in the engine compartment which was then reunited with its mother.
"Inquiries would suggest that two other kittens fell from the engine compartment while the vehicle was in motion."

He said that it was with "great relief" that the force could confirm "this was a tragic and unforeseeable accident rather than the act of a callous owner".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-24131421
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JamesWhiteheadOffline
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PostPosted: 17-09-2013 22:37    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just one thing puzzles me, said the cop before he left. This ad. you put in the paper:

"VW, low mileage, 2 litter engine, one callous owner, offers"

Shocked
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 01-10-2013 16:00    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eurasian Scops Owl takes refuge on HMS Illustrious

A owl which "ran out of steam" during its migration and "took refuge" on a Royal Navy warship has been returned to the wild.
Portsmouth-based aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious was patrolling off Yemen when the Eurasian scops owl was spotted cowering under a crane on deck.

Lt Chris Patrick, a member of the Royal Naval Bird Watching Society, spent several days nursing it back to health.
He said the "poor little thing must have seen the ship and took refuge".
Lt Patrick, from Weymouth, said the owl had landed on the vessel while on a migration route south towards Sub-Saharan Africa.
He said it had "looked as though it was simply waiting to die".

Weather conditions meant the bird would not be able to make it to shore, so he took it to his cabin and fed it pieces of meat.
Within two days, it was trying to fly again and Lt Patrick, the ship's meteorologist, calculated the best location to release the bird when wind conditions were favourable.

Lt Patrick said it had looked "in good condition" when it was released near the coast of Oman and was "heading to shore with the prevailing winds".
"We all hope it made the journey safely," he said.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-24349122
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 23-10-2013 08:29    Post subject: Reply with quote

Missing cat from Portsmouth is found safe and well – in Scotland!
by Ellie Pilmoor
ellie.pilmoor@thenews.co.uk
Published 19/10/2013 09:39

WHEN her cat went missing, Lisa Chamberlain had no idea where she might have gone.
But, eight weeks later, the mum-of-two from Jervis Road, Stamshaw, had a call saying Gypsy had turned up in Scotland.
The black and brown cat was found by a woman in Lanarkshire – 500 miles away.

Lisa said: ‘I couldn’t believe it when I got the call from the RSPCA up in Scotland,
‘They said Gypsy is really underweight but is good in herself.
‘But, I have no way of getting her home and it is such a long way.
‘I don’t know what to do next but I am glad she’s safe.’

Lisa added that she has no idea how Gypsy got to Scotland.
‘No one knows what might have happened. Maybe she accidently got on a lorry or something, who knows.’

http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/news/missing-cat-from-portsmouth-is-found-safe-and-well-in-scotland-1-5604801


Missing Portsmouth cat returns home from Scotland
Published 23/10/2013 07:40

A MISSING cat that turned up in Scotland is now home.
Lisa Chamberlain, from Stamshaw, is celebrating the return of her pet, Gypsy.

The cat was found in Lanarkshire, eight weeks after she went missing, as reported on Saturday.
She was returned home on Monday night after a courier service picked her up for free. yeay

http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/news/missing-portsmouth-cat-returns-home-from-scotland-1-5613427

Very Happy
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 23-10-2013 11:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very good news! Very Happy
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 02-11-2013 16:37    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a remarkable tale!

Alderney's 'ghost pig' may be wild boar from France

A wild boar which has been on the loose in Alderney for more than a month is thought to have swum there from the nearby French coast.
The boar found its way into a pig farm on Friday but, when approached, escaped by jumping over a 1m (3ft) stock fence.
Farm owner Tess Woodnutt said she would not have believed the animal could jump so high from a standing start, if she had not seen it with her own eyes.

Islanders have dubbed the boar "ghost pig", as it has only been seen at dusk.

Mrs Woodnutt said she first became aware of the boar on 27 September, when she was on holiday and received a call from a fellow islander saying one of their 40 pigs had escaped.
However, her son Jake immediately went to the farm and soon established there was none missing.

Steve Shaw, who was Alderney harbour master for 25 years, said he did not believe it would be possible for a wild boar to get to the island by boat without the crew noticing, and he had never heard of a wild boar being found on any vessel.

Some islanders have speculated the animal could be an "iron age pig", which have been farmed on the island.
However, Alan Woodnutt, Tess's husband, said he was certain it was not.
"Iron age pigs are a cross between a wild boar and a Tamworth," he said.
"They look a bit like a wild boar but this animal was not the progeny of an iron age pig."

Mrs Woodnutt said the boar's arrival on the island was a mystery but she had had it confirmed to her by an expert in the UK that a wild boar could swim long distances in open water.
Wild boar are commonly found in Normandy, the coast of which lies seven miles (11km) to the east of Alderney.

Duty Insp Kieran McGrath from Guernsey Police said islanders should contact them if they spotted the animal and should not approach it themselves, as any wild boar could be dangerous when cornered.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-guernsey-24785508

It must have been lucky with the tides, which can flow quite fast around Alderney.
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 09-01-2014 12:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

'Unique' bird migration discovered
[Video: The tag was recovered from a male red-necked phalarope in Shetland]

A tracking device which weighs less than a paperclip has helped scientists uncover what they say is one of the world's great bird migrations.
It was attached to a red-necked phalarope from Scotland that migrated thousands of miles west across the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean.
The journey has never before been recorded for a European breeding bird.

The red-necked phalarope is one of the UK's rarest birds, and is only found in Shetland and the Western Isles.

The RSPB, working alongside the Swiss Ornithological Institute and Dave Okill of the Shetland Ringing Group, fitted individual geolocators to 10 red-necked phalaropes nesting on the island of Fetlar in Shetland in 2012.
Each geolocator weighed 0.6g and was fitted to the bird with harnesses made from tubing.
It was hoped the trackers would shed light on where the birds, which are smaller than starlings, spend the winter.

After successfully recapturing one of the tagged birds when it returned to Fetlar last spring, experts discovered it had made an epic 16,000-mile round trip during its annual migration. Shocked

It had flown from Shetland across the Atlantic via Iceland and Greenland, south down the eastern seaboard of the US, across the Caribbean and Mexico, ending up off the coast of Ecuador and Peru.
After wintering in the Pacific, it returned to Fetlar, following a similar route
.

Prior to this, many experts had assumed that Scottish breeding phalaropes joined the Scandinavian population at their wintering grounds, thought to be in the Arabian Sea.

Although long, the phalarope migration is beaten by some distance by Arctic terns, which make a return trip of about 24,000 miles between the North and South poles each year.

However, the phalarope is the only known westward migration into the Pacific. This westward movement in late summer and autumn is into the prevailing weather and in virtually the opposite direction to all other migrants leaving the UK.
Numbers of red-necked phalarope in Scotland fluctuate between just 15 and 50 nesting males.

Malcie Smith of the RSPB told BBC Scotland he had almost fallen out of his chair when the tracking results showed where the birds had gone. Cool
He added: "We are freezing up here in Shetland and it's quite nice to think of our red necked phalaropes bobbing about in the warm tropical waters of the Pacific.
"What it tells us is that this bird isn't part of an offshoot population from Scandinavia. Our Shetland population is actually an offshoot of a North American population.

"It means that what we thought was a kind of medium-distance migrant is actually a long-distance migrant. It is one of the world's great migrations.
"We've known for some time that birds undergo big migrations. We all know about Arctic terns and swallows and this is pretty much in the same ballpark."

Scotland marks the southern limit of the breeding range of the small, colourful waders, with the species far more abundant further north.

The birds are perhaps best known for turning the tables on traditional gender roles, with male phalaropes incubating eggs and raising young in the summer, while the female uses her brightly coloured plumage to attract new partners.

In winter, phalaropes congregate in large flocks at sea in regions where currents create cold, nutrient-rich water and support blooms of plankton on which the birds feed.

By continuing the project and retrieving more tags from phalaropes after their winter migration next year, experts hope to learn the extent to which the Scottish population may be impacted by future changes at sea.

They also hope to learn how the species might respond to any change, and whether any negative impacts in these wintering areas can be mitigated by conservation management in Scotland.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-25661650
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 21-01-2014 07:27    Post subject: Reply with quote

Urban fox's record-breaking country walk
By Ella Davies, Reporter, BBC Nature

A fox has been tracked more than 40 miles (70km) away from its home range, breaking the previous British record.
The fox was named Fleet by University of Brighton researchers and fitted with a satellite tagged collar.
Scientists were surprised to record Fleet walking a total of 195 miles (315km) as he headed into the Sussex countryside from his home in the city.
Naturalist Chris Packham joined the team to retrace the animal's path for BBC Two series Winterwatch.

"Foxes will disperse for lots of different reasons, mainly to find some space to form their own territories," explained Dr Dawn Scott who led the study.
"The movement away from an area where they're born to another area is usually due to competition within the group."

A team of researchers has been studying the movements of urban foxes living in Brighton to understand more about their population dynamics and movements.
Through their records and observations by members of the public, Dr Scott's team learned that Fleet was pushed out of the group as the dominant male by his son, causing him to look for territory elsewhere.
"The previous furthest distance recorded, which was in Wales, was 52km [32 miles]," said Dr Scott.
A straight line measurement from Fleet's home to his furthest distance was 40 miles (70km) as he took a roundabout route through the Sussex countryside.

The tag in his collar provided the researchers with a GPS location every 30 minutes. Analysis of this data provided the team with a detailed picture of Fleet's movements.
Between 9 December 2013 and 2 January 2014, Fleet walked a total of 195 miles (315km) around Sussex.
He headed north from Brighton through the South Downs National Park to commuter town Hassocks and then took a rambling route east to Rye.

Dr Scott explained that he followed roads, train lines and rivers but where the wet weather had flooded land he was cautious to skirt around the water.
During the day, he rested in gardens or on railway sidings before journeying through the countryside at night.

"We know from other studies in Europe and in the [United] States that foxes can travel very far... this is the furthest record in this country," said Dr Scott.
The team expected Fleet to stop but he carried on in what Dr Scott described as "very unusual behaviour".

According to their records, Fleet was born in Brighton and his home range was a few neighbouring streets. He was fed by a member of the public in their garden and raised cubs in the area.
"We know they move between urban and rural [environments] but that transition from this very urbanised fox to then going across country for a long distance is not what we would expect," said Dr Scott.
"We think that his son has pushed him out and that pressure has caused him to leave and try to find somewhere else."
His early movements were across Brighton but with about 20 foxes per kilometre squared in the city, Dr Scott explained that finding a new territory would have been difficult.

Fleet's whereabouts now are unknown after researchers lost his collar's signal early in the New Year.
However, the data they were able to collect will help scientists to understand how foxes move around their environment and what factors effect this, such as the availability of food and mates and any obstacles including flood waters and human developments.
"It helps us understand the divide that people perceive between urban and rural foxes - that actually the populations are connected and they do move between the two," Dr Scott said.

She added that the results confirm the animals will move out to colonise other areas when populations in urban areas reach their maximum densities.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/25759153
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 15:34    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mystery of 'Fuerteventura' cat found in Muchalls garage in Aberdeenshire

Mystery surrounds the discovery of a cat in an Aberdeenshire garage which has been traced via its identity chip to Fuerteventura in the Canary Islands.
BBC Scotland has learned the cat was found by a family in Muchalls on Thursday.

They contacted Cats Protection before taking it to a vet, and the cat was traced to the Spanish island through an international database after the national one drew a blank.
It has been named Juanita.
It will be found a new home if the owners cannot be traced.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-25977638

Did it travel somehow... or Teleport?! Wink
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Spudrick68Offline
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PostPosted: 31-01-2014 21:15    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could it have stowed on a ship somehow?
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 01-02-2014 00:26    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spudrick68 wrote:
Could it have stowed on a ship somehow?


A catamaran?
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sherbetbizarreOffline
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PostPosted: 01-02-2014 00:28    Post subject: Reply with quote

The one full of rats? Wink
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rynner2Offline
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PostPosted: 01-02-2014 20:31    Post subject: Reply with quote

'Spanish' cat found in Scottish garage reunited with her owner

A cat microchipped in Spain which was found in a garage in Aberdeenshire has been reunited with her owner.
Shorthaired tabby Tina, found in Muchalls on Thursday, was registered in Las Palmas in Fuerteventura.
The phone number on record was disconnected and it was suspected the owner may have emigrated to the UK and not updated the address details.

A ring-round of vets by Cats Protection led to one recognising the owner and the pair were reunited in Aberdeen.
The owner, Fiona Prati, used to live in Fuerteventura and now stays in Bridge of Don.

Tina went missing from her home last week and it is thought she may have hopped a ride on a vehicle and travelled 30 miles to Muchalls.
The tabby has been looked after at Kirkton Vets since being found in a family's garage and was reunited with her owner by vet Fiona MacPherson on Saturday.

Ms MacPherson said: "We were delighted when Fiona came to collect her and we're so pleased that we were able to help reunite them.
"Fiona even heard the story on the radio as she was driving to collect Tina. She told us how pleased she was that Tina was ok as she had feared the worst."

Zahir White, from Cats Protection, said: "It is great news that Tina's owner has been found and we're happy we were able to play a part in reuniting them.
"Every week we help to reunite 50 lost cats with their owners across the UK and this is one of the most unusual cases we have come across.
"It is always heart-breaking when a much-loved cat goes missing and the owner never knows what became of them. Cases like this show how important it is to get cats microchipped and keep the microchip details up-to-date."

After seeing the story on the BBC, a Fuerteventura-based cat charity contacted Cats Protection offering to check the animal's registration details against its own records.
Twinkle Trust, which organises the sterilisation of stray cats by volunteer vets from the UK and Fuerteventura, has rehomed more than 100 in the UK since 1995.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-25997769

So we have a cat named Tina/Juanita, and a vet and the owner called Fiona... Confusing, ain't it?
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