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Krazy North Korea
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 03-01-2014 21:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course its nonsense; Kim ate them himself.

Quote:
Did Kim Jong Un feed his uncle to dogs?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-echochambers-25597324
Anthony Zurcher
By Anthony Zurcher
Editor, Echo Chambers

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un applauds during an official ceremony on April 14, 2012.

Who benefits from rumours of Kim Jong Un's barbarism?

It sounds like something out of a Quentin Tarantino movie. Rumours are flying that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un ordered his uncle, Jang Song Thaek, and five aides executed by being stripped naked and placed in a cage with 120 attack dogs.

This is all according to Singapore's Straits Times, which quotes a 12 December story in the Chinese government-controlled paper Wen Wei Po.

"The horrifying report vividly depicted the brutality of the young North Korean leader," Ching Cheong writes in the Times. "The fact that it appeared in a Beijing-controlled newspaper showed that China no longer cares about its relations with the Kim regime."

The Telegraph's Tim Stanley cautions that this story is "tempting" - probably too tempting to be true.

"The thing about North Korea is that it's so mad, so gruesome that it's difficult not to believe whatever tall story you hear about it," he writes. "Kim Jong Un ate a baby? The army uses kittens for target practice? Kim Jong Il's reanimated corpse stalks the countryside scaring children? It all seems possible."

He warns that it's important to look at the agendas of the people who are spreading this story:

The Straits Times is a respectable and widely read publication, but it's often been accused of being the mouthpiece of Singapore's ruling party and is staunchly anti-communist - so political bias is possible. Finally, we can't dismiss the possibility that China itself has fabricated or at least encouraged the story to send a message to Pyongyang. Kim's uncle was the architect of closer economic ties between the China and North Korea and there is thought to be a lot of anger about his death.

The Washington Post's Max Fisher writes a five-point takedown of the story that almost - almost - settles the question.

"The fact that the Western media have so widely accepted a story they would reject if it came out of any other country tells us a lot about how North Korea is covered - and how it's misunderstood," he writes.

Fisher also says that the Western media have an incentive to cover these kind of bizarre stories, as they generate a lot of attention. He quotes NKNews.org editor Chad O'Carroll as saying, "As you know, NK stories tend to get a lot of hits, so it's easy to see why editors will want to pursue these stories."

It would make things easier, writes Slate's Joshua Keating, if the North Korean government commented publicly on stories like this - but it's called the hermit kingdom for a reason.

"So given the Internet's insatiable appetite for weird North Korea stories, it becomes a bit of a free-for-all," he writes. "The North Korean government does so many bizarre things we can confirm that a few of these dubious rumors must surely be true, right?"

Sure. And hey, it makes for a compelling, albeit macabre, tale.
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2014 01:23    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps he ran out of dog food?
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YithianOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2014 06:45    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dog eats man. Role-reversal on the Korean peninsula.
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2014 12:17    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know if I'd be comfortable around pet dogs which had developed a taste for human flesh even if I was a dictator drunk with power, so I doubt it's true, they probably "just" shot him. It's all about the image, I suspect.
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2014 18:41    Post subject: Reply with quote

dogs eat everything they don't develop a taste for anything.

If anything, well fed mutts are probably safer house pets.

(Its just a silly story, Im sure...but such an appealing one.)
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MonstrosaOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2014 19:33    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm sure he lets attack dogs wander around his palaces.
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KondoruOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2014 19:54    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, they are probably some fearsome toy breed.

More bite for your chow.
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 04-01-2014 20:05    Post subject: Reply with quote

How often does the average attack dog get to attack someone, never mind eat them, anyway?
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 06-01-2014 23:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe it was a shaggy dog story.

Quote:
A cautionary tale of dogs, imposters and North Korea
John Sudworth
By John Sudworth
BBC News, Shanghai
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-china-blog-25621324

Jang Song Thaek, with his hands tied with a rope, is dragged into the court by uniformed personnel in this December 13, 2013 picture taken from Rodong Sinmun December 12, 2013

Kim Jong-un's uncle was executed and denounced in North Korea as a threat to the state

An anonymous blogger is a tenuous enough source for a news story. But an imposter posing as that anonymous blogger?!

Perhaps not since "Curveball" - the now discredited Iraqi defector whose evidence was used to make the case for war - has an unreliable single source had such a field day.

The extraordinary claim that the North Korean leader Kim Jong-un had his uncle fed alive to a pack of hungry dogs comes from this posting on a Chinese microblog.

It's been pointed out by those who've unearthed the trail that all it took was a bit of Chinese and some basic curiosity. But as the sensational story was splashed around the world the original, extremely shaky sourcing on which it was based was lost.

The post containing the gory details of the alleged execution is from a blogger calling himself Choi Seongho and claiming to be a North Korean newspaper editor now studying in China. His blog on Tencent, the country's second most popular microblogging platform, carries satirical comments about life in North Korea. He has 30,000 followers and he doesn't reply to direct messages.

He also has a namesake. There is a Choi Seongho very much alive and blogging on Sina, China's leading platform. The content is very similar, a mix of seemingly tongue-in-cheek North Korean patriotism and mild satire. But he has more than two million followers, was the first of the two to open an account, and although he keeps his identity anonymous, does reply to direct messages.

When asked by the BBC whether he was the source for the dog story, he denied it, saying; "The person on Tencent is someone trying to be me, who is not me."

Admittedly, many of the news organisations carrying the North Korean execution story have wondered out loud at its authenticity. Now we know the original sourcing, a single anonymous Chinese blog masquerading as another, more popular, Chinese blog, the story looks too weak to be worth the ink.

In the end, what all this tells us, as others have pointed out, is that when it comes to North Korea, we're too ready to entertain our darkest imaginings, even if we don't quite believe them ourselves.

It is certainly a dark and secretive place, but that makes it all the more important that we report the truth, not a sensational parody of it.

BBC China Blog

The BBC China blog is where our teams across the country will provide a flavour of their latest insights.

We'll focus on the new and newsworthy, but also use our journalists' expertise to shine fresh light on China's remarkable transformations and upheavals.

Most of the posts will be written or filmed by journalists in our main bureau, in Beijing, or in our other bases in Shanghai and Hong Kong.

Please let us know what you think and send us your ideas. You can also use #BBCChinablog to keep up to date with our reports via Twitter.

Read more blog entries
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gncxxOffline
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PostPosted: 07-01-2014 18:22    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought it was too bad to be true.
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 12-01-2014 14:38    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Irish bookmaker Paddy Power gives Irish whiskey, baby clothes to North Korean dictator

UN sanctions broken with gifts to Kim Jong-un before Rodman basketball game?
By PATRICK COUNIHAN, IrishCentral Staff Writer
Published Saturday, January 11, 2014, 7:46 AM Updated Saturday, January 11, 2014, 7:46 AM

Kim Jong-un and Dennis Rodman

An Irish bookmaker has denied breaking United Nations sanctions with a series of gifts presented to the infamous North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

The Paddy Power betting company has confirmed to the Irish Times that its representative presented the notorious dictator with Irish whiskey, a set of baby clothes and a handbag before Christmas.

A statement from the company confirmed the gifts were presented to Jong-un by spokesperson Rory Scott in December as part of the company’s commercial relationship with basketball star Dennis Rodman.

But Paddy Power denied they broke UN sanctions against North Korea.

The statement said: “Here’s what Paddy Power No.2 spokesperson Rory Scott brought to North Korea on his pre Christmas trip as recommended by our protocol advisor - an Irish whiskey set, a traditional baby dress and a handbag.

“The whiskey set consisted of a bottle of Jameson, a decanter and two glasses. I can confirm that we didn’t buy anything else for Dennis to give to Kim.”

Dennis P Halpin, a former U.S. consul to the country, had claimed that the total cost of birthday gifts given to Kim Jong-un was ‘reportedly well over $10,000’.

He said: “It included several hundred dollars’ worth of Irish Jameson whiskey and European crystal, an Italian suit for him, and Italian clothing, a fur coat, and an English Mulberry handbag for her (Kim’s wife, Ri Sol-ju).”

In response Paddy Power said the value of the gifts it sent to North Korea had been ‘vastly overestimated’. The company denied knowledge about some of the items on Halpin’s list.

The statement continued: “We never comment on budgets or costs so I can’t confirm the total value, but it was a fraction of your source’s estimation.

“The company has no knowledge of Italian suits or fur coats or any of the other things you mentioned.”

The Jameson distillers and parent company Pernod Ricard told the paper it had ‘no involvement in this presentation’ and ‘could not comment on anyone choosing to drink Jameson Whiskey or not’.

UN sanctions against North Korea have been in place since a 2006 nuclear test.

The report adds that the European Union followed UN Security Resolution 1718 by being the first body to define a list of ‘luxury goods’ banned from export to North Korea.

The EU list stipulates that high quality spirits and spirituous beverages, handbags and similar articles and lead crystal glassware” are all banned from export to North Korea.

The Irish Independent says the list means that gifts such as the Jameson whiskey set and handbag Paddy Power gave to Kim Jong Un may have violated rules.

Paddy Power said: “We are satisfied that we haven’t breached any export control sanctions in relation to this matter. On our pre Christmas visit to North Korea we brought items of modest value as a token gesture as recommended by a North Korean protocol advisor.”

The Paddy Power company ended its partnership with Dennis Rodman and his basketball diplomacy initiative on Christmas eve when it cited changing circumstances in North Korea.

A statement at the time said: “There has been almost total condemnation of North Korea worldwide, and we’re really responding to that.”

Ireland’s Department of Foreign Affairs told the paper that Ireland applies the UN and EU provisions concerning North Korea.

A spokesman said: “Amongst other things, this prohibits the sale, supply, transfer, or export of luxury goods to the Democratic People’s of Korea.

“Penalties have been established under Irish law for contravening this Regulation.”

Irish broadcaster Matt Cooper accompanied NBA legend Rodman to North Korea this week to witness the exhibition basketball game in Pyongyang.

Working on a documentary for a British production company, Cooper revealed that every move he made was watched.

He said: “I was accompanied at all times. From the time that I entered the lobby in the hotel when I came down from my room, we weren’t allowed out on our own, we weren’t allowed out on foot we had to drive everywhere.

“That was something we had anticipated, we knew they was no chance we were actually going to get out and about and get away from our minders.

“This was unfortunately one of the conditions that we would have to operate under.

“Much to my surprise we were given internet access. We negotiated internet access and got it after two days. Our mobile phones wouldn’t work and there was no wifi in the hotel but we were able to plug in a laptop to find out what was going on back home.

“I was able to ring home and talk to Aileen my wife to fill her in on what was going on but we were working under the assumption that the phones were tapped and that we were being watched at all times.”

Read more: http://www.irishcentral.com/news/Irish-bookmaker-Paddy-Power-gives-Irish-whiskey-baby-clothes-to-North-Korean-dictator-239740801.html#ixzz2qC9KrPJ3
Follow us: @IrishCentral on Twitter | IrishCentral on Facebook
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ramonmercadoOffline
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 00:35    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
In North Korea, You Want Meth With That?
THE DRUG IS EVERYWHERE, NOT FROWNED UPON, AND A BUDDING COTTAGE INDUSTRY

By Polly Davis Doig, Newser Staff
Posted Jan 27, 2014 3:45 PM CST
STORY COMMENTS (27)

Embed this story
(NEWSER) – North Korea's growing drug problems are fairly well documented, and the Los Angeles Times today takes a deeper dive into the reasons driving the rise, particularly that of crystal meth. In a harsh nation where the sins of an uncle can doom an entire branch of the family tree, Pyongyang has shown relatively little interest in cracking down on narcotics—pot is legal, opium is a common pain reliever, and meth is used to treat colds, flagging energy, and hunger. "If you go to somebody's house it is a polite way to greet somebody by offering them a sniff," says one North Korean. "It is like drinking coffee when you're sleepy, but ice is so much better."

Meth was long produced by Pyongyang itself, as a cash cow export used to fund Kim Jong Il's whims. But since the state officially got out of the meth business, it seems everyone in the impoverished nation wants to be Walter White. One former miner who tried hawking just about everything finally turned to dealing meth. "It was just enough money that I could buy rice to eat and coal for heating," she says. "North Korean people learn fast to reuse their skills," says another ex-pat of the North Koreans driving a cottage industry large enough to spill over the border with China—along with all the problems inherent with the drug trade. Says the meth dealer, who's since quit: "I was doing bad things because everybody else was doing bad things."

http://www.newser.com/story/181357/in-north-korea-you-want-meth-with-that.html?ir=Weird%20News
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krakentenOffline
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 04:42    Post subject: Reply with quote

North Korea is a true criminal empire.

Every time you go to the store, and the cashier scrubs a pen over the bill you offered, thank the Kims. Using their status as a sovreign nation, they purchase currency paper and inks. Then they make money-but not their own, other peoples. This racket turns up mucho mazuma for the Hermit Kingdom-but none of it for the poor souls living there.

I doubt the story of the man fed to dogs-Americans are prone to believe anything about a Communist country. For years, a story circulated that Oleg Penkovsky, an agent who gave the West a lot of good information, was put into the crematory retort alive. Actually, he was shot first, just like everybody else who displeased the Soviet rulers.

These are bad people, but even they have limits.

I often wonder what will happen when the North Korean regime collapses-even China is getting sick of the Kims-and all those starving,, wretched people are turned loose to wander Asia like ghosts.

Not a happy thought.
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kamalktkOffline
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 14:03    Post subject: Reply with quote

North Koreans and choco pies.
http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/27/world/asia/choco-pie-koreas/
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YithianOffline
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PostPosted: 30-01-2014 14:55    Post subject: Reply with quote

Choco-pies are excellent. They're basically thicker but less wide wagon wheels with slightly more cream in. Perfect for hangovers with the grenade shaped banana milk that's inevitably sold nearby.
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